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Is ischemia the only factor predicting cardiovascular outcomes in all diabetes mellitus patients?

Overview of attention for article published in Cardiovascular Diabetology, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
18 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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12 Mendeley
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Title
Is ischemia the only factor predicting cardiovascular outcomes in all diabetes mellitus patients?
Published in
Cardiovascular Diabetology, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12933-017-0533-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mark W. Kennedy, Enrico Fabris, Harry Suryapranata, Elvin Kedhi

Abstract

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with an excess in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and is characterized by increased rates of coronary artery disease. Furthermore, once atherosclerosis is established, this is associated with an increased extent, complexity and a more rapid progression than seen in non-DM patients. Ischemia is the single most important predictor of future hard cardiac events and ischemia correction remains the cornerstone of current revascularization strategies. However recent data suggests that, in DM patients, coronary atherosclerosis despite the absence of ischemia, detected by either invasive or non-invasive methods, may not be associated with the same low risk of future cardiac events as seen in non-DM patients. This review seeks to examine the current evidence supporting an ischemia driven revascularization strategy, and to challenge the notion that ischemia is the only clinically relevant factor in the prediction of cardiovascular outcomes in all-comer DM patients. Specifically, we examine whether in DM patients certain characteristics beyond ischemia, such as microvascular disease, coronary atherosclerosis burden, progression and plaque composition, may need to be considered for a more refined risk stratification in these high-risk patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 8%
Unknown 11 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 2 17%
Student > Master 2 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Student > Postgraduate 1 8%
Other 4 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 5 42%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 17%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 May 2017.
All research outputs
#1,592,437
of 13,560,201 outputs
Outputs from Cardiovascular Diabetology
#83
of 794 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,222
of 263,435 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cardiovascular Diabetology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,560,201 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 794 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,435 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them