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A decade of insights into grassland ecosystem responses to global environmental change

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Ecology & Evolution, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

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111 Mendeley
Title
A decade of insights into grassland ecosystem responses to global environmental change
Published in
Nature Ecology & Evolution, April 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41559-017-0118
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elizabeth T. Borer, James B. Grace, W. Stanley Harpole, Andrew S. MacDougall, Eric W. Seabloom

Abstract

Earth's biodiversity and carbon uptake by plants, or primary productivity, are intricately interlinked, underlie many essential ecosystem processes, and depend on the interplay among environmental factors, many of which are being changed by human activities. While ecological theory generalizes across taxa and environments, most empirical tests of factors controlling diversity and productivity have been observational, single-site experiments, or meta-analyses, limiting our understanding of variation among site-level responses and tests of general mechanisms. A synthesis of results from ten years of a globally distributed, coordinated experiment, the Nutrient Network (NutNet), demonstrates that species diversity promotes ecosystem productivity and stability, and that nutrient supply and herbivory control diversity via changes in composition, including invasions of non-native species and extinction of native species. Distributed experimental networks are a powerful tool for tests and integration of multiple theories and for generating multivariate predictions about the effects of global changes on future ecosystems.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 88 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 111 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
Unknown 108 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 35 32%
Researcher 28 25%
Student > Bachelor 10 9%
Student > Master 9 8%
Other 7 6%
Other 14 13%
Unknown 8 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 49 44%
Environmental Science 32 29%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 8 7%
Computer Science 3 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 16 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 50. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 August 2018.
All research outputs
#369,071
of 14,005,544 outputs
Outputs from Nature Ecology & Evolution
#605
of 988 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,788
of 264,811 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Ecology & Evolution
#64
of 95 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,005,544 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 988 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 149.9. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,811 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 95 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.