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ATM kinase sustains breast cancer stem-like cells by promoting ATG4C expression and autophagy

Overview of attention for article published in Oncotarget, February 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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26 Mendeley
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Title
ATM kinase sustains breast cancer stem-like cells by promoting ATG4C expression and autophagy
Published in
Oncotarget, February 2017
DOI 10.18632/oncotarget.15537
Pubmed ID
Authors

Martina Antonelli, Flavie Strappazzon, Ivan Arisi, Rossella Brandi, Mara D’Onofrio, Manolo Sambucci, Gwenola Manic, Ilio Vitale, Daniela Barilà, Venturina Stagni

Abstract

The efficacy of Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) kinase signalling inhibition in cancer therapy is tempered by the identification of new emerging functions of ATM, which suggests that the role of this protein in cancer progression is complex. We recently demonstrated that this tumor suppressor gene could act as tumor promoting factor in HER2 (Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2) positive breast cancer. Herein we put in evidence that ATM expression sustains the proportion of cells with a stem-like phenotype, measured as the capability to form mammospheres, independently of HER2 expression levels. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that, in mammospheres, ATM modulates the expression of cell cycle-, DNA repair- and autophagy-related genes. Among these, the silencing of the autophagic gene, autophagy related 4C cysteine peptidase (ATG4C), impairs mammosphere formation similarly to ATM depletion. Conversely, ATG4C ectopic expression in cells silenced for ATM expression, rescues mammospheres growth. Finally, tumor array analyses, performed using public data, identify a significant correlation between ATM and ATG4C expression levels in all human breast cancer subtypes, except for the basal-like one.Overall, we uncover a new connection between ATM kinase and autophagy regulation in breast cancer. We demonstrate that, in breast cancer cells, ATM and ATG4C are essential drivers of mammosphere formation, suggesting that their targeting may improve current approaches to eradicate breast cancer cells with a stem-like phenotype.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 23%
Student > Master 5 19%
Other 3 12%
Student > Bachelor 3 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 12%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 54%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 15%
Neuroscience 2 8%
Unspecified 1 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 2 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 April 2017.
All research outputs
#7,159,744
of 9,719,571 outputs
Outputs from Oncotarget
#4,602
of 10,959 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#171,295
of 261,396 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oncotarget
#470
of 1,240 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,719,571 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,959 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,396 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,240 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.