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Prevalence, Diversity, and Load of Borrelia species in Ticks That Have Fed on Humans in Regions of Sweden and Åland Islands, Finland with Different Lyme Borreliosis Incidences

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, November 2013
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters
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11 Facebook pages

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30 Mendeley
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Title
Prevalence, Diversity, and Load of Borrelia species in Ticks That Have Fed on Humans in Regions of Sweden and Åland Islands, Finland with Different Lyme Borreliosis Incidences
Published in
PLoS ONE, November 2013
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0081433
Pubmed ID
Authors

Peter Wilhelmsson, Pontus Lindblom, Linda Fryland, Jan Ernerudh, Pia Forsberg, Per-Eric Lindgren

Abstract

The incidence of Lyme borreliosis (LB) in a region may reflect the prevalence of Borrelia in the tick population. Our aim was to investigate if regions with different LB incidences can be distinguished by studying the prevalence and diversity of Borrelia species in their respective tick populations. The Borrelia load in a feeding tick increases with the duration of feeding, which may facilitate a transmission of Borrelia Spirochetes from tick to host. Therefore, we also wanted to investigate how the Borrelia load in ticks that have fed on humans varies with the duration of tick feeding. During 2008 and 2009, ticks that had bitten humans were collected from four regions of Sweden and Finland, regions with expected differences in LB incidence. The duration of tick feeding was estimated and Borrelia were detected and quantified by a quantitative PCR assay followed by species determination. Out of the 2,154 Ixodes ricinus ticks analyzed, 26% were infected with Borrelia and seven species were identified. B. spielmanii was detected for the first time in the regions. The tick populations collected from the four regions exhibited only minor differences in both prevalence and diversity of Borrelia species, indicating that these variables alone cannot explain the regions' different LB incidences. The number of Borrelia cells in the infected ticks ranged from fewer than ten to more than a million. We also found a lower number of Borrelia cells in adult female ticks that had fed for more than 36 hours, compared to the number of Borrelia cells found in adult female ticks that had fed for less than 36 hours.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
South Africa 1 3%
United Kingdom 1 3%
Czech Republic 1 3%
Unknown 27 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 30%
Researcher 8 27%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 7%
Other 5 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 50%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 10%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 7%
Other 4 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 March 2014.
All research outputs
#602,941
of 5,387,375 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#14,985
of 93,949 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,892
of 129,708 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#961
of 7,309 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,387,375 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 93,949 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 129,708 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7,309 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.