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Development of Raman microspectroscopy for automated detection and imaging of basal cell carcinoma

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Biomedical Optics, January 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
patent
1 patent

Citations

dimensions_citation
59 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
71 Mendeley
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Title
Development of Raman microspectroscopy for automated detection and imaging of basal cell carcinoma
Published in
Journal of Biomedical Optics, January 2009
DOI 10.1117/1.3251053
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marta Larraona-Puy, Adrian Ghita, Alina Zoladek, William Perkins, Sandeep Varma, Iain H. Leach, Alexey A. Koloydenko, Hywel Williams, Ioan Notingher

Abstract

We investigate the potential of Raman microspectroscopy (RMS) for automated evaluation of excised skin tissue during Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS). The main aim is to develop an automated method for imaging and diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) regions. Selected Raman bands responsible for the largest spectral differences between BCC and normal skin regions and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) are used to build a multivariate supervised classification model. The model is based on 329 Raman spectra measured on skin tissue obtained from 20 patients. BCC is discriminated from healthy tissue with 90+/-9% sensitivity and 85+/-9% specificity in a 70% to 30% split cross-validation algorithm. This multivariate model is then applied on tissue sections from new patients to image tumor regions. The RMS images show excellent correlation with the gold standard of histopathology sections, BCC being detected in all positive sections. We demonstrate the potential of RMS as an automated objective method for tumor evaluation during MMS. The replacement of current histopathology during MMS by a "generalization" of the proposed technique may improve the feasibility and efficacy of MMS, leading to a wider use according to clinical need.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Denmark 1 1%
Unknown 69 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 32%
Researcher 19 27%
Student > Master 9 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 4%
Lecturer 3 4%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 5 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 13 18%
Physics and Astronomy 12 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 10%
Chemistry 7 10%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 11 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 July 2018.
All research outputs
#1,444,033
of 13,171,980 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Biomedical Optics
#66
of 1,510 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,246
of 245,377 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Biomedical Optics
#2
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,171,980 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,510 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 245,377 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.