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Telephone-delivered weight management services in the hospital outpatient setting: Decision-makers’ perceptions of their use in routine practice

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition & Dietetics, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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3 Mendeley
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Title
Telephone-delivered weight management services in the hospital outpatient setting: Decision-makers’ perceptions of their use in routine practice
Published in
Nutrition & Dietetics, March 2016
DOI 10.1111/1747-0080.12277
Pubmed ID
Authors

Megan E. Whelan, Ana D. Goode, Ingrid J. Hickman, Elizabeth G. Eakin, Marina M. Reeves

Abstract

Providing effective weight management services to the growing number of overweight or obese hospital patients necessitates long-term service provision; however, it is arguably not within the acute-care hospital remit to provide such extended services. Referral to community-based programs is required to provide continuing weight management services. The Get Healthy Service is a free six-month, telephone-delivered lifestyle program, now offered in several states of Australia with potential for wide population reach. However, health practitioner referral into the service has been low. The study aimed to examine awareness and suitability of the Get Healthy Service for referral of hospital outpatients for weight management, among key health-care decision-makers. Nine key decision-makers from metropolitan and rural Queensland Health hospitals took part in semi-structured telephone interviews that were audio-recorded (January-July 2014), transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Interviews revealed that most decision-makers had limited awareness of the Get Healthy Service but perceived the telephone service to be suitable for patient referrals. Incorporating Get Healthy Service referrals into patient care was seen to be potentially valuable and relatively easy to implement, with most interviewees suggesting that they would provide a Get Healthy Service brochure to patients who could then self-refer into the service. The Get Healthy Service provides a referral model for weight management service provision that appears feasible for use in Queensland hospital settings. Increased awareness and a more integrated approach to referrals would likely result in improved enrolment to the service, with future research needed to demonstrate this.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 3 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 3 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor 1 33%
Student > Postgraduate 1 33%
Unspecified 1 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 1 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 September 2017.
All research outputs
#7,047,760
of 12,486,858 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition & Dietetics
#238
of 405 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119,264
of 258,761 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition & Dietetics
#7
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,486,858 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 405 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,761 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.