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On the impoverishment of scientific education

Overview of attention for article published in EURASIP Journal on Bioinformatics & Systems Biology, November 2013
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Mentioned by

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1 Google+ user

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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19 Mendeley
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Title
On the impoverishment of scientific education
Published in
EURASIP Journal on Bioinformatics & Systems Biology, November 2013
DOI 10.1186/1687-4153-2013-15
Pubmed ID
Authors

Edward R Dougherty

Abstract

Hannah Arendt, one of the foremost political philosophers of the twentieth century, has argued that it is the responsibility of educators not to leave children in their own world but instead to bring them into the adult world so that, as adults, they can carry civilization forward to whatever challenges it will face by bringing to bear the learning of the past. In the same collection of essays, she discusses the recognition by modern science that Nature is inconceivable in terms of ordinary human conceptual categories - as she writes, 'unthinkable in terms of pure reason'. Together, these views on scientific education lead to an educational process that transforms children into adults, with a scientific adult being one who has the ability to conceptualize scientific systems independent of ordinary physical intuition. This article begins with Arendt's basic educational and scientific points and develops from them a critique of current scientific education in conjunction with an appeal to educate young scientists in a manner that allows them to fulfill their potential 'on the shoulders of giants'. While the article takes a general philosophical perspective, its specifics tend to be directed at biomedical education, in particular, how such education pertains to translational science.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 5%
United States 1 5%
Unknown 17 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 26%
Researcher 4 21%
Lecturer 2 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 11%
Unspecified 1 5%
Other 4 21%
Unknown 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 37%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 16%
Computer Science 2 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Mathematics 1 5%
Other 3 16%
Unknown 2 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 December 2013.
All research outputs
#7,801,308
of 12,434,754 outputs
Outputs from EURASIP Journal on Bioinformatics & Systems Biology
#22
of 51 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119,105
of 228,290 outputs
Outputs of similar age from EURASIP Journal on Bioinformatics & Systems Biology
#3
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,434,754 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 51 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.7. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 228,290 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.