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Talking About Breast Cancer: Which Symptoms and Treatment Side Effects are Important to Patients with Advanced Disease?

Overview of attention for article published in The Patient, April 2017
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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33 Mendeley
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Title
Talking About Breast Cancer: Which Symptoms and Treatment Side Effects are Important to Patients with Advanced Disease?
Published in
The Patient, April 2017
DOI 10.1007/s40271-017-0242-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anna Niklasson, Jean Paty, Anna Rydén

Abstract

Patients' experience of symptoms and associated treatment is an increasingly important consideration in both regulatory and health technology assessments, and can inform treatment decisions. This study aimed to gain insight directly from patients with advanced breast cancer about which symptoms and treatment side effects are important to them. Women with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer were interviewed individually by trained interviewers, using a semi-structured interview guide. Verbatim transcripts were analyzed qualitatively, including whether symptoms were mentioned spontaneously (indicating their importance to patients) or only when questioned directly. Sixteen women (aged 38-74 years) participated. The most commonly reported symptom aspects were: pain (16/16 [all reported spontaneously]); feeling tired/fatigued (15/16 [12 spontaneously]); changes in weight (15/16 [2 spontaneously]); hair loss (15/16 [5 spontaneously]); changes in appetite (11/16 [8 spontaneously]); nausea (9/16 [all spontaneously]). Pain was attributed mostly to the disease or to its treatment. Tiredness, changes in weight/appetite, and hair loss were attributed mostly to the treatment. All women (14 spontaneously) reported that the cancer affected their emotional well-being and their ability to perform daily activities. Further qualitative research is needed to understand how patients distinguish cancer-related symptoms from treatment-related side effects, to gain insight into which patient experiences should be measured and how best to measure them.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 18%
Other 6 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 12%
Researcher 3 9%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Other 6 18%
Unknown 5 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 39%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 21%
Psychology 3 9%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Sports and Recreations 1 3%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 5 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 April 2017.
All research outputs
#7,164,831
of 9,725,367 outputs
Outputs from The Patient
#180
of 239 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#171,127
of 261,402 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The Patient
#17
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,725,367 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 239 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,402 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.