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Sex differences in the structural connectome of the human brain

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, December 2013
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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423 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1292 Mendeley
citeulike
7 CiteULike
Title
Sex differences in the structural connectome of the human brain
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, December 2013
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1316909110
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. Ingalhalikar, A. Smith, D. Parker, T. D. Satterthwaite, M. A. Elliott, K. Ruparel, H. Hakonarson, R. E. Gur, R. C. Gur, R. Verma

Abstract

Sex differences in human behavior show adaptive complementarity: Males have better motor and spatial abilities, whereas females have superior memory and social cognition skills. Studies also show sex differences in human brains but do not explain this complementarity. In this work, we modeled the structural connectome using diffusion tensor imaging in a sample of 949 youths (aged 8-22 y, 428 males and 521 females) and discovered unique sex differences in brain connectivity during the course of development. Connection-wise statistical analysis, as well as analysis of regional and global network measures, presented a comprehensive description of network characteristics. In all supratentorial regions, males had greater within-hemispheric connectivity, as well as enhanced modularity and transitivity, whereas between-hemispheric connectivity and cross-module participation predominated in females. However, this effect was reversed in the cerebellar connections. Analysis of these changes developmentally demonstrated differences in trajectory between males and females mainly in adolescence and in adulthood. Overall, the results suggest that male brains are structured to facilitate connectivity between perception and coordinated action, whereas female brains are designed to facilitate communication between analytical and intuitive processing modes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 593 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,292 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 26 2%
United Kingdom 17 1%
Spain 9 <1%
Germany 6 <1%
Netherlands 6 <1%
Brazil 5 <1%
Switzerland 5 <1%
Japan 5 <1%
France 5 <1%
Other 27 2%
Unknown 1181 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 309 24%
Researcher 213 16%
Student > Master 173 13%
Student > Bachelor 161 12%
Unspecified 89 7%
Other 346 27%
Unknown 1 <1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 308 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 205 16%
Unspecified 179 14%
Neuroscience 177 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 125 10%
Other 297 23%
Unknown 1 <1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1299. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 September 2019.
All research outputs
#2,235
of 13,536,188 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#91
of 80,459 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34
of 251,565 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#2
of 939 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,536,188 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 80,459 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 251,565 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 939 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.