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Genomic analyses identify hundreds of variants associated with age at menarche and support a role for puberty timing in cancer risk

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Genetics, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#24 of 6,510)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
77 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
89 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
208 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
377 Mendeley
citeulike
4 CiteULike
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Title
Genomic analyses identify hundreds of variants associated with age at menarche and support a role for puberty timing in cancer risk
Published in
Nature Genetics, April 2017
DOI 10.1038/ng.3841
Pubmed ID
Authors

Felix R Day, Deborah J Thompson, Hannes Helgason, Daniel I Chasman, Hilary Finucane, Patrick Sulem, Katherine S Ruth, Sean Whalen, Abhishek K Sarkar, Eva Albrecht, Elisabeth Altmaier, Marzyeh Amini, Caterina M Barbieri, Thibaud Boutin, Archie Campbell, Ellen Demerath, Ayush Giri, Chunyan He, Jouke J Hottenga, Robert Karlsson, Ivana Kolcic, Po-Ru Loh, Kathryn L Lunetta, Massimo Mangino, Brumat Marco, George McMahon, Sarah E Medland, Ilja M Nolte, Raymond Noordam, Teresa Nutile, Lavinia Paternoster, Natalia Perjakova, Eleonora Porcu, Lynda M Rose, Katharina E Schraut, Ayellet V Segrè, Albert V Smith, Lisette Stolk, Alexander Teumer, Irene L Andrulis, Stefania Bandinelli, Matthias W Beckmann, Javier Benitez, Sven Bergmann, Murielle Bochud, Eric Boerwinkle, Stig E Bojesen, Manjeet K Bolla, Judith S Brand, Hiltrud Brauch, Hermann Brenner, Linda Broer, Thomas Brüning, Julie E Buring, Harry Campbell, Eulalia Catamo, Stephen Chanock, Georgia Chenevix-Trench, Tanguy Corre, Fergus J Couch, Diana L Cousminer, Angela Cox, Laura Crisponi, Kamila Czene, George Davey Smith, Eco J C N de Geus, Renée de Mutsert, Immaculata De Vivo, Joe Dennis, Peter Devilee, Isabel dos-Santos-Silva, Alison M Dunning, Johan G Eriksson, Peter A Fasching, Lindsay Fernández-Rhodes, Luigi Ferrucci, Dieter Flesch-Janys, Lude Franke, Marike Gabrielson, Ilaria Gandin, Graham G Giles, Harald Grallert, Daniel F Gudbjartsson, Pascal Guénel, Per Hall, Emily Hallberg, Ute Hamann, Tamara B Harris, Catharina A Hartman, Gerardo Heiss, Maartje J Hooning, John L Hopper, Frank Hu, David J Hunter, M Arfan Ikram, Hae Kyung Im, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Peter K Joshi, David Karasik, Manolis Kellis, Zoltan Kutalik, Genevieve LaChance, Diether Lambrechts, Claudia Langenberg, Lenore J Launer, Joop S E Laven, Stefania Lenarduzzi, Jingmei Li, Penelope A Lind, Sara Lindstrom, YongMei Liu, Jian'an Luan, Reedik Mägi, Arto Mannermaa, Hamdi Mbarek, Mark I McCarthy, Christa Meisinger, Thomas Meitinger, Cristina Menni, Andres Metspalu, Kyriaki Michailidou, Lili Milani, Roger L Milne, Grant W Montgomery, Anna M Mulligan, Mike A Nalls, Pau Navarro, Heli Nevanlinna, Dale R Nyholt, Albertine J Oldehinkel, Tracy A O'Mara, Sandosh Padmanabhan, Aarno Palotie, Nancy Pedersen, Annette Peters, Julian Peto, Paul D P Pharoah, Anneli Pouta, Paolo Radice, Iffat Rahman, Susan M Ring, Antonietta Robino, Frits R Rosendaal, Igor Rudan, Rico Rueedi, Daniela Ruggiero, Cinzia F Sala, Marjanka K Schmidt, Robert A Scott, Mitul Shah, Rossella Sorice, Melissa C Southey, Ulla Sovio, Meir Stampfer, Maristella Steri, Konstantin Strauch, Toshiko Tanaka, Emmi Tikkanen, Nicholas J Timpson, Michela Traglia, Thérèse Truong, Jonathan P Tyrer, André G Uitterlinden, Digna R Velez Edwards, Veronique Vitart, Uwe Völker, Peter Vollenweider, Qin Wang, Elisabeth Widen, Ko Willems van Dijk, Gonneke Willemsen, Robert Winqvist, Bruce H R Wolffenbuttel, Jing Hua Zhao, Magdalena Zoledziewska, Marek Zygmunt, Behrooz Z Alizadeh, Dorret I Boomsma, Marina Ciullo, Francesco Cucca, Tõnu Esko, Nora Franceschini, Christian Gieger, Vilmundur Gudnason, Caroline Hayward, Peter Kraft, Debbie A Lawlor, Patrik K E Magnusson, Nicholas G Martin, Dennis O Mook-Kanamori, Ellen A Nohr, Ozren Polasek, David Porteous, Alkes L Price, Paul M Ridker, Harold Snieder, Tim D Spector, Doris Stöckl, Daniela Toniolo, Sheila Ulivi, Jenny A Visser, Henry Völzke, Nicholas J Wareham, James F Wilson, Amanda B Spurdle, Unnur Thorsteindottir, Katherine S Pollard, Douglas F Easton, Joyce Y Tung, Jenny Chang-Claude, David Hinds, Anna Murray, Joanne M Murabito, Kari Stefansson, Ken K Ong, John R B Perry

Abstract

The timing of puberty is a highly polygenic childhood trait that is epidemiologically associated with various adult diseases. Using 1000 Genomes Project-imputed genotype data in up to ∼370,000 women, we identify 389 independent signals (P < 5 × 10(-8)) for age at menarche, a milestone in female pubertal development. In Icelandic data, these signals explain ∼7.4% of the population variance in age at menarche, corresponding to ∼25% of the estimated heritability. We implicate ∼250 genes via coding variation or associated expression, demonstrating significant enrichment in neural tissues. Rare variants near the imprinted genes MKRN3 and DLK1 were identified, exhibiting large effects when paternally inherited. Mendelian randomization analyses suggest causal inverse associations, independent of body mass index (BMI), between puberty timing and risks for breast and endometrial cancers in women and prostate cancer in men. In aggregate, our findings highlight the complexity of the genetic regulation of puberty timing and support causal links with cancer susceptibility.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 89 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 377 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Finland 2 <1%
United States 2 <1%
Unknown 373 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 82 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 60 16%
Student > Bachelor 37 10%
Student > Master 36 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 24 6%
Other 75 20%
Unknown 63 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 88 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 77 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 63 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 3%
Psychology 11 3%
Other 46 12%
Unknown 79 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 665. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 March 2020.
All research outputs
#14,489
of 16,165,488 outputs
Outputs from Nature Genetics
#24
of 6,510 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#506
of 268,593 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Genetics
#1
of 82 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,165,488 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,510 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 34.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,593 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 82 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.