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Lyme disease ecology in a changing world: consensus, uncertainty and critical gaps for improving control

Overview of attention for article published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
16 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
38 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
132 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
347 Mendeley
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Title
Lyme disease ecology in a changing world: consensus, uncertainty and critical gaps for improving control
Published in
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, April 2017
DOI 10.1098/rstb.2016.0117
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. Marm Kilpatrick, Andrew D. M. Dobson, Taal Levi, Daniel J. Salkeld, Andrea Swei, Howard S. Ginsberg, Anne Kjemtrup, Kerry A. Padgett, Per M. Jensen, Durland Fish, Nick H. Ogden, Maria A. Diuk-Wasser

Abstract

Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne disease in temperate regions of North America, Europe and Asia, and the number of reported cases has increased in many regions as landscapes have been altered. Although there has been extensive work on the ecology and epidemiology of this disease in both Europe and North America, substantial uncertainty exists about fundamental aspects that determine spatial and temporal variation in both disease risk and human incidence, which hamper effective and efficient prevention and control. Here we describe areas of consensus that can be built on, identify areas of uncertainty and outline research needed to fill these gaps to facilitate predictive models of disease risk and the development of novel disease control strategies. Key areas of uncertainty include: (i) the precise influence of deer abundance on tick abundance, (ii) how tick populations are regulated, (iii) assembly of host communities and tick-feeding patterns across different habitats, (iv) reservoir competence of host species, and (v) pathogenicity for humans of different genotypes of Borrelia burgdorferi Filling these knowledge gaps will improve Lyme disease prevention and control and provide general insights into the drivers and dynamics of this emblematic multi-host-vector-borne zoonotic disease.This article is part of the themed issue 'Conservation, biodiversity and infectious disease: scientific evidence and policy implications'.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 38 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 347 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 345 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 63 18%
Student > Master 52 15%
Student > Bachelor 52 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 51 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 28 8%
Other 55 16%
Unknown 46 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 100 29%
Environmental Science 45 13%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 30 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 30 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 21 6%
Other 55 16%
Unknown 66 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 168. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 July 2022.
All research outputs
#184,209
of 21,807,934 outputs
Outputs from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#143
of 6,161 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,412
of 283,860 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#6
of 97 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,807,934 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,161 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,860 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 97 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.