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Association of Mild Leg Length Discrepancy and Degenerative Changes in the Hip Joint and Lumbar Spine

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Manipulative & Physiological Therapeutics, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
9 tweeters
facebook
7 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
45 Mendeley
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Title
Association of Mild Leg Length Discrepancy and Degenerative Changes in the Hip Joint and Lumbar Spine
Published in
Journal of Manipulative & Physiological Therapeutics, June 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.jmpt.2017.03.001
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kelvin J. Murray, Tom Molyneux, Michael R. Le Grande, Aurora Castro Mendez, Franz K. Fuss, Michael F. Azari

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between mild leg length discrepancy (LLD) and degenerative joint disease (DJD) or osteoarthritis. We evaluated standard postural lumbopelvic radiographs from 255 adults (121 women and 134 men) who had presented with spinal pain for chiropractic care. Symmetry of femoral head diameters was used to exclude magnification errors. Pearson's partial correlation was used to control for age and derive effect sizes for LLD on DJD in the hip and lower lumbar motion segments. Krippendorff's α was used for intraobserver and interobserver reliability. A strong correlation was found between LLD and hip DJD in men (r = 0.532) and women (r = 0.246). We also found a strong correlation between LLD and DJD at the L5-S1 motion segment in men (r = 0.395) and women (r = 0.246). At the L4-5 spinal level this correlation was much attenuated in men (r = 0.229) and women (r = 0.166). These findings suggest an association between LLD and hip and lumbar DJD. Cause-effect relationships between mild LLD and DJD deserve to be properly evaluated in future longitudinal cohort studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 2%
Unknown 44 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 18%
Student > Master 7 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 13%
Other 4 9%
Student > Postgraduate 2 4%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 11 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 22%
Engineering 4 9%
Psychology 1 2%
Sports and Recreations 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 15 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 July 2018.
All research outputs
#1,315,317
of 13,278,410 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Manipulative & Physiological Therapeutics
#160
of 1,097 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,039
of 263,205 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Manipulative & Physiological Therapeutics
#6
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,278,410 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,097 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,205 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.