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Brain-to-Brain Synchrony Tracks Real-World Dynamic Group Interactions in the Classroom

Overview of attention for article published in Current Biology, May 2017
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
43 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
433 tweeters
facebook
10 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
80 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
488 Mendeley
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Title
Brain-to-Brain Synchrony Tracks Real-World Dynamic Group Interactions in the Classroom
Published in
Current Biology, May 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2017.04.002
Pubmed ID
Authors

Suzanne Dikker, Lu Wan, Ido Davidesco, Lisa Kaggen, Matthias Oostrik, James McClintock, Jess Rowland, Georgios Michalareas, Jay J. Van Bavel, Mingzhou Ding, David Poeppel

Abstract

The human brain has evolved for group living [1]. Yet we know so little about how it supports dynamic group interactions that the study of real-world social exchanges has been dubbed the "dark matter of social neuroscience" [2]. Recently, various studies have begun to approach this question by comparing brain responses of multiple individuals during a variety of (semi-naturalistic) tasks [3-15]. These experiments reveal how stimulus properties [13], individual differences [14], and contextual factors [15] may underpin similarities and differences in neural activity across people. However, most studies to date suffer from various limitations: they often lack direct face-to-face interaction between participants, are typically limited to dyads, do not investigate social dynamics across time, and, crucially, they rarely study social behavior under naturalistic circumstances. Here we extend such experimentation drastically, beyond dyads and beyond laboratory walls, to identify neural markers of group engagement during dynamic real-world group interactions. We used portable electroencephalogram (EEG) to simultaneously record brain activity from a class of 12 high school students over the course of a semester (11 classes) during regular classroom activities (Figures 1A-1C; Supplemental Experimental Procedures, section S1). A novel analysis technique to assess group-based neural coherence demonstrates that the extent to which brain activity is synchronized across students predicts both student class engagement and social dynamics. This suggests that brain-to-brain synchrony is a possible neural marker for dynamic social interactions, likely driven by shared attention mechanisms. This study validates a promising new method to investigate the neuroscience of group interactions in ecologically natural settings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 433 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 488 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 <1%
United States 2 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Algeria 1 <1%
Turkey 1 <1%
Unknown 481 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 126 26%
Researcher 89 18%
Student > Master 55 11%
Unspecified 54 11%
Student > Bachelor 52 11%
Other 112 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 150 31%
Unspecified 92 19%
Neuroscience 83 17%
Computer Science 34 7%
Engineering 30 6%
Other 99 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 639. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 September 2019.
All research outputs
#10,584
of 13,844,357 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#119
of 10,181 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#512
of 264,253 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#8
of 221 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,844,357 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,181 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 42.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,253 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 221 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.