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Manufacturing Differences Affect Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Characteristics and Function: Comparison of Production Methods and Products from Multiple Centers

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, April 2017
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Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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35 Dimensions

Readers on

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54 Mendeley
Title
Manufacturing Differences Affect Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Characteristics and Function: Comparison of Production Methods and Products from Multiple Centers
Published in
Scientific Reports, April 2017
DOI 10.1038/srep46731
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shutong Liu, Luis F. de Castro, Ping Jin, Sara Civini, Jiaqiang Ren, Jo-Anna Reems, Jose Cancelas, Ramesh Nayak, Georgina Shaw, Timothy O’Brien, David H. McKenna, Myriam Armant, Leslie Silberstein, Adrian P. Gee, Derek J. Hei, Peiman Hematti, Sergei A. Kuznetsov, Pamela G. Robey, David F. Stroncek

Abstract

Human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) are manufactured using many different methods, but little is known about the spectrum of manufacturing methods used and their effects on BMSC characteristics and function. Seven centers using, and one developing, Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) processes were surveyed as to their production methods. Among the seven centers, all used marrow aspirates as the starting material, but no two centers used the same manufacturing methods. Two to four BMSC lots from each center were compared using global gene expression. Among the twenty-four BMSC lots from the eight centers intra-center transcriptome variability was low and similar among centers. Principal component analysis and unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis separated all the lots from five centers into five distinct clusters. BMSCs from six of the eight centers were tested for their ability to form bone and support hematopoiesis by in vivo transplantation (defining features of BMSCs). Those from all six centers tested formed bone, but the quantity formed was highly variable and BMSCs from only three centers supported hematopoiesis. These results show that differences in manufacturing resulted in variable BMSC characteristics including their ability to form bone and support hematopoiesis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 53 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 31%
Student > Master 9 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 9%
Student > Bachelor 4 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 7%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 8 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 7%
Chemical Engineering 2 4%
Other 9 17%
Unknown 14 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 July 2019.
All research outputs
#8,527,369
of 14,162,573 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#39,005
of 72,474 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#141,326
of 265,012 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#1,186
of 2,225 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,162,573 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 72,474 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.5. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,012 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,225 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.