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Progressive cutaneous Cryptococcosis complicated with meningitis in a myasthenia gravis patient on long-term immunosuppressive therapy – a case report

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2017
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Title
Progressive cutaneous Cryptococcosis complicated with meningitis in a myasthenia gravis patient on long-term immunosuppressive therapy – a case report
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, April 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2415-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nguyen Thi Cam Huong, Ahmed M. A. Altibi, Nguyen My Hoa, Le Anh Tuan, Samar Salman, Sara Morsy, Nguyen Thi Bich Lien, Nguyen Thanh Truong, Nguyen Thi Hoang Mai, Pham Thi Le Hoa, Nguyen Ba Thang, Van The Trung

Abstract

Cryptococcosis is an opportunistic infection caused by the encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans and most remarkably manifests in HIV-infected individuals, especially in the settings of very low CD4 count. Development of cryptococcosis in HIV-uninfected individuals is exceedingly rare and usually signifies a marked immunodeficiency. Cryptococcosis in association with myasthenia gravis or thymoma has been previously documented in only very few cases in the literature. We reported a complicated case of severe cutaneous cryptococcosis in a 39-year-old Vietnamese male patient with myasthenia gravis on long-term immunosuppressive therapy. The patient presented with a five month history of recurrent and progressive skin lesions that later on progressed into cryptococcal meningitis. Through this case, we aimed to emphasize the importance of including cutaneous cryptococcosis in the differential diagnosis of cutaneous lesions in patients on chronic immunosuppressive therapy. The cutaneous manifestations of cryptococcosis can be the first clue for a disseminated disease, which makes early recognition crucial and life-saving.

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The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 4 14%
Student > Master 4 14%
Librarian 2 7%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 7%
Other 4 14%
Unknown 11 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 38%
Neuroscience 2 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 3%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 11 38%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2020.
All research outputs
#15,457,417
of 22,968,808 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#4,515
of 7,707 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#193,678
of 309,828 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#109
of 181 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,968,808 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,707 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.6. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 309,828 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 181 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.