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Mapping information exposure on social media to explain differences in HPV vaccine coverage in the United States

Overview of attention for article published in Vaccine, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
13 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
116 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
33 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
125 Mendeley
Title
Mapping information exposure on social media to explain differences in HPV vaccine coverage in the United States
Published in
Vaccine, May 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.04.060
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adam G. Dunn, Didi Surian, Julie Leask, Aditi Dey, Kenneth D. Mandl, Enrico Coiera

Abstract

Together with access, acceptance of vaccines affects human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine coverage, yet little is known about media's role. Our aim was to determine whether measures of information exposure derived from Twitter could be used to explain differences in coverage in the United States. We conducted an analysis of exposure to information about HPV vaccines on Twitter, derived from 273.8 million exposures to 258,418 tweets posted between 1 October 2013 and 30 October 2015. Tweets were classified by topic using machine learning methods. Proportional exposure to each topic was used to construct multivariable models for predicting state-level HPV vaccine coverage, and compared to multivariable models constructed using socioeconomic factors: poverty, education, and insurance. Outcome measures included correlations between coverage and the individual topics and socioeconomic factors; and differences in the predictive performance of the multivariable models. Topics corresponding to media controversies were most closely correlated with coverage (both positively and negatively); education and insurance were highest among socioeconomic indicators. Measures of information exposure explained 68% of the variance in one dose 2015 HPV vaccine coverage in females (males: 63%). In comparison, models based on socioeconomic factors explained 42% of the variance in females (males: 40%). Measures of information exposure derived from Twitter explained differences in coverage that were not explained by socioeconomic factors. Vaccine coverage was lower in states where safety concerns, misinformation, and conspiracies made up higher proportions of exposures, suggesting that negative representations of vaccines in the media may reflect or influence vaccine acceptance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 116 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 125 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 124 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 22%
Unspecified 22 18%
Researcher 19 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 7%
Other 28 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 32 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 24 19%
Social Sciences 19 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 14%
Psychology 9 7%
Other 24 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 178. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2019.
All research outputs
#78,567
of 13,630,548 outputs
Outputs from Vaccine
#55
of 11,349 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,558
of 263,167 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Vaccine
#4
of 208 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,630,548 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,349 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,167 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 208 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.