↓ Skip to main content

Personal attitudes towards smoking in a national sample of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers and recent quitters

Overview of attention for article published in Medical Journal of Australia, June 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
29 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Personal attitudes towards smoking in a national sample of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers and recent quitters
Published in
Medical Journal of Australia, June 2015
DOI 10.5694/mja14.01535
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anna K Nicholson, Ron Borland, Pele T Bennet, Anke E Sterren, Matthew Stevens, David P Thomas

Abstract

To describe attitudes towards smoking in a national sample of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers and recent quitters and assess how they are associated with quitting, and to compare these attitudes with those of smokers in the general Australian population. The Talking About The Smokes project used a quota sampling design to recruit participants from communities served by 34 Aboriginal community-controlled health services and one community in the Torres Strait. We surveyed 1392 daily smokers, 251 non-daily smokers and 78 recent quitters from April 2012 to October 2013. Personal attitudes towards smoking and quitting, wanting to quit, and attempting to quit in the past year. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander daily smokers were less likely than daily smokers in the general Australian population to report enjoying smoking (65% v 81%) and more likely to disagree that smoking is an important part of their life (49% v 38%); other attitudes were similar between the two groups. In the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander sample, non-daily smokers generally held less positive attitudes towards smoking compared with daily smokers, and ex-smokers who had quit within the past year reported positive views about quitting. Among the daily smokers, 78% reported regretting starting to smoke and 81% reported spending too much money on cigarettes, both of which were positively associated with wanting and attempting to quit; 32% perceived smoking to be an important part of their life, which was negatively associated with both quit outcomes; and 83% agreed that smoking calms them down when stressed, which was not associated with the quitting outcomes. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers were less likely than those in the general population to report positive reasons to smoke and held similar views about the negative aspects, suggesting that factors other than personal attitudes may be responsible for the high continuing smoking rate in this population.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 3%
Unknown 28 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 17%
Researcher 5 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 14%
Other 3 10%
Student > Master 2 7%
Other 4 14%
Unknown 6 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 7%
Psychology 2 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 7 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 January 2018.
All research outputs
#3,588,303
of 12,400,381 outputs
Outputs from Medical Journal of Australia
#875
of 2,042 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,115
of 262,640 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Medical Journal of Australia
#23
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,400,381 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,042 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.9. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,640 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.