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Loss to follow-up in tuberculosis treatment and its relationship with patients' knowledge of the disease and other associated factors

Overview of attention for article published in Revista de Salud Pública, February 2017
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1 tweeter

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Title
Loss to follow-up in tuberculosis treatment and its relationship with patients' knowledge of the disease and other associated factors
Published in
Revista de Salud Pública, February 2017
DOI 10.15446/rsap.v18n5.54842
Pubmed ID
Authors

Belchior, Aylana De S., Mainbourg, Evelyne Marie T., Ferreira-Gonçalves, Maria J., Belchior, Aylana De S., Mainbourg, Evelyne Marie T., Ferreira-Gonçalves, Maria J.

Abstract

To identify factors associated with loss to follow-up in Tuberculosis (TB) treatment, including patients' level of knowledge regarding treatment of this disease. 42 loss to follow-up cases and 84 control cases that were finishing the sixth month of their first treatment for tuberculosis were selected for this study. Primary data were gathered through interviews, while secondary data were obtained from the notification form of the disease, between December 2011 and April 2012. Factors associated with loss to follow-up were analyzed by means of a conditional logistic regression multivariate model for matched case-control groups. No significant differences were observed between loss to follow-up cases and controls regarding socioeconomic factors, lifestyle, clinical condition, treatment-related behaviors and the access of patients to sources of information on TB. In the regression multivariate analysis, significant associations with retreatment after loss to follow-up that were detected include: scarce knowledge on tuberculosis, lack of adherence to consultation during the current treatment, noncompliance with follow-up consultation deadline, smoking and HIV negative. When compared to controls, cases undergoing TB retreatment after loss to follow-up have less knowledge on the disease, which is a sign for the professionals responsible for health education of the need to invest more time and efforts in activities that help the patient understand the disease and its treatment, as well as to have higher levels of adherence. In addition, noncompliance with the follow-up consultation deadline, failure to attend consultations during the current treatment and smoking are also factors that may be influenced by poor knowledge on the disease, which leads to the treatment loss to follow-up.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 2 4%
Other 1 2%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 2%
Unknown 41 91%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 7%
Unknown 42 93%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 May 2017.
All research outputs
#8,484,610
of 9,752,643 outputs
Outputs from Revista de Salud Pública
#58
of 85 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#218,902
of 262,451 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Revista de Salud Pública
#6
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,752,643 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 85 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.