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Intestinal microbiota, diet and health

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Nutrition, August 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
twitter
12 tweeters
patent
1 patent
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
315 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
723 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
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Title
Intestinal microbiota, diet and health
Published in
British Journal of Nutrition, August 2013
DOI 10.1017/s0007114513002560
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susan E. Power, Paul W. O'Toole, Catherine Stanton, R. Paul Ross, Gerald F. Fitzgerald

Abstract

The human intestine is colonised by 10¹³ to 10¹⁴ micro-organisms, the vast majority of which belong to the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes. Although highly stable over time, the composition and activities of the microbiota may be influenced by a number of factors including age, diet and antibiotic treatment. Although perturbations in the composition or functions of the microbiota are linked to inflammatory and metabolic disorders (e.g. inflammatory bowel diseases, irritable bowel syndrome and obesity), it is unclear at this point whether these changes are a symptom of the disease or a contributing factor. A better knowledge of the mechanisms through which changes in microbiota composition (dysbiosis) promote disease states is needed to improve our understanding of the causal relationship between the gut microbiota and disease. While evidence of the preventive and therapeutic effects of probiotic strains on diarrhoeal illness and other intestinal conditions is promising, the exact mechanisms of the beneficial effects are not fully understood. Recent studies have raised the question of whether non-viable probiotic strains can confer health benefits on the host by influencing the immune system. As the potential health effect of these non-viable bacteria depends on whether the mechanism of this effect is dependent on viability, future research needs to consider each probiotic strain on a case-by-case basis. The present review provides a comprehensive, updated overview of the human gut microbiota, the factors influencing its composition and the role of probiotics as a therapeutic modality in the treatment and prevention of diseases and/or restoration of human health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 723 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 <1%
United States 2 <1%
France 1 <1%
Ireland 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Other 7 <1%
Unknown 704 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 140 19%
Student > Bachelor 119 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 108 15%
Researcher 75 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 38 5%
Other 107 15%
Unknown 136 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 147 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 145 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 92 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 57 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 38 5%
Other 80 11%
Unknown 164 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 47. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 November 2022.
All research outputs
#739,905
of 22,491,736 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Nutrition
#403
of 5,986 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,061
of 177,716 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Nutrition
#9
of 88 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,491,736 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,986 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 177,716 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 88 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.