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Sex-based differences in outcomes after severe injury: an analysis of blunt trauma patients in China

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, May 2017
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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26 Mendeley
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Title
Sex-based differences in outcomes after severe injury: an analysis of blunt trauma patients in China
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13049-017-0389-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ziqiang Zhu, Xiaoping Shang, Peiyi Qi, Shengli Ma

Abstract

Experimental research suggests that females have a higher survival rate after trauma, although this claim is controversial. This study sought to determine the role of sex on mortality among trauma patients in China. The study enrolled 1789 trauma patients who visited the Emergency Intensive Care Unit of the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University during 2015 and 2016. A retrospective data analysis was performed to determine sex-based differences after blunt trauma. Patients were stratified by age and injury severity (using the Injury Severity Score). Multiple logistic regression was used to analyze the association between sex and post-injury complications and mortality. Female trauma patients experienced a significantly lower risk of mortality than males (odds ratio, 0.931; 95% confidence interval, 0.883-0.982). This survival advantage of females was particularly notable in the 'younger than 45 years' age group. Sex-based differences were also found in the occurrence of life-threatening complications after trauma. This study demonstrated that females are more likely to survival after severe blunt trauma and also have less inpatient complications than men, suggesting an important role for sex hormones after severe traumatic injury.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 15%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 10 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 38%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 15%
Mathematics 1 4%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Chemistry 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 9 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2017.
All research outputs
#11,068,057
of 17,117,795 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#819
of 1,039 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#160,263
of 272,313 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,117,795 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,039 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,313 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them