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Mountain landscapes offer few opportunities for high-elevation tree species migration

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, February 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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28 Dimensions

Readers on

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101 Mendeley
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Title
Mountain landscapes offer few opportunities for high-elevation tree species migration
Published in
Global Change Biology, February 2014
DOI 10.1111/gcb.12504
Pubmed ID
Authors

David M. Bell, John B. Bradford, William K. Lauenroth

Abstract

Climate change is anticipated to alter plant species distributions. Regional context, notably the spatial complexity of climatic gradients, may influence species migration potential. While high-elevation species may benefit from steep climate gradients in mountain regions, their persistence may be threatened by limited suitable habitat as land area decreases with elevation. To untangle these apparently contradictory predictions for mountainous regions, we evaluated the climatic suitability of four coniferous forest tree species of the western United States based on species distribution modeling (SDM) and examined changes in climatically suitable areas under predicted climate change. We used forest structural information relating to tree species dominance, productivity, and demography from an extensive forest inventory system to assess the strength of inferences made with a SDM approach. We found that tree species dominance, productivity, and recruitment were highest where climatic suitability (i.e., probability of species occurrence under certain climate conditions) was high, supporting the use of predicted climatic suitability in examining species risk to climate change. By predicting changes in climatic suitability over the next century, we found that climatic suitability will likely decline, both in areas currently occupied by each tree species and in nearby unoccupied areas to which species might migrate in the future. These trends were most dramatic for high elevation species. Climatic changes predicted over the next century will dramatically reduce climatically suitable areas for high-elevation tree species while a lower elevation species, Pinus ponderosa, will be well positioned to shift upslope across the region. Reductions in suitable area for high-elevation species imply that even unlimited migration would be insufficient to offset predicted habitat loss, underscoring the vulnerability of these high-elevation species to climatic changes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 101 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 8 8%
Spain 2 2%
Slovakia 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Unknown 86 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 23 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 22%
Researcher 20 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 8%
Other 6 6%
Other 19 19%
Unknown 3 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 43 43%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 33 33%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 9 9%
Computer Science 1 <1%
Unspecified 1 <1%
Other 6 6%
Unknown 8 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 April 2014.
All research outputs
#6,542,676
of 12,353,915 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#2,649
of 3,359 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,651
of 217,291 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#71
of 95 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,353,915 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,359 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.2. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 217,291 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 95 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.