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To migrate, stay put, or wander? Varied movement strategies in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)

Overview of attention for article published in Movement Ecology, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#25 of 129)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
14 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
51 Mendeley
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Title
To migrate, stay put, or wander? Varied movement strategies in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)
Published in
Movement Ecology, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40462-017-0102-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rachel E. Wheat, Stephen B. Lewis, Yiwei Wang, Taal Levi, Christopher C. Wilmers

Abstract

Quantifying individual variability in movement behavior is critical to understanding population-level patterns in animals. Here, we explore intraspecific variation in movement strategies of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) in the north Pacific, where there is high spatiotemporal resource variability. We tracked 28 bald eagles (five immature, 23 adult) using GPS transmitters between May 2010 and January 2016. We found evidence of four movement strategies among bald eagles in southeastern Alaska and western Canada: breeding individuals that were largely sedentary and remained near nest sites year-round, non-breeding migratory individuals that made regular seasonal travel between northern summer and southern winter ranges, non-breeding localized individuals that displayed fidelity to foraging sites, and non-breeding nomadic individuals with irregular movement. On average, males traveled farther per day than females. Most nomadic individuals were immature, and all residential individuals (i.e. breeders and localized birds) were adults. Alternative movement strategies among north Pacific eagles are likely associated with the age and sex class, as well as breeding status, of an individual. Intraspecific variation in movement strategies within the population results in different space use patterns among contingents, which has important implications for conservation and management.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 49 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 33%
Student > Master 11 22%
Researcher 6 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 6%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 3 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 31 61%
Environmental Science 9 18%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Computer Science 1 2%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 8 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 November 2017.
All research outputs
#779,247
of 12,151,889 outputs
Outputs from Movement Ecology
#25
of 129 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#30,382
of 267,550 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Movement Ecology
#4
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,151,889 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 129 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,550 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.