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Interarm Difference in Systolic Blood Pressure in Different Ethnic Groups and Relationship to the “White Coat Effect”: A Cross-Sectional Study

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Hypertension (Science Direct), May 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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6 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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14 Mendeley
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Title
Interarm Difference in Systolic Blood Pressure in Different Ethnic Groups and Relationship to the “White Coat Effect”: A Cross-Sectional Study
Published in
American Journal of Hypertension (Science Direct), May 2017
DOI 10.1093/ajh/hpx073
Pubmed ID
Authors

Claire Lorraine Schwartz, Christopher Clark, Constantinos Koshiaris, Paramjit S Gill, Shelia M Greenfield, Sayeed M Haque, Gurdip Heer, Amanpreet Johal, Ramandeep Kaur, Jonathan Mant, Una Martin, Mohamed A Mohammed, Sally Wood, Richard J McManus

Abstract

Interarm differences (IADs) ≥10 mm Hg in systolic blood pressure (BP) are associated with greater incidence of cardiovascular disease. The effect of ethnicity and the white coat effect (WCE) on significant systolic IADs (ssIADs) are not well understood. Differences in BP by ethnicity for different methods of BP measurement were examined in 770 people (300 White British, 241 South Asian, 229 African-Caribbean). Repeated clinic measurements were obtained simultaneously in the right and left arm using 2 BPTru monitors and comparisons made between the first reading, mean of second and third and mean of second to sixth readings for patients with, and without known hypertension. All patients had ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). WCE was defined as systolic clinic BP ≥10 mm Hg higher than daytime ABPM. No significant differences were seen in the prevalence of ssIAD between ethnicities whichever combinations of BP measurement were used and regardless of hypertensive status. ssIADs fell between the 1st measurement (161, 22%), 2nd/3rd (113, 16%), and 2nd-6th (78, 11%) (1st vs. 2nd/3rd and 2nd-6th, P < 0.001). Hypertensives with a WCE were more likely to have ssIADs on 1st, (odds ratio [OR] 1.73 (95% confidence interval 1.04-2.86); 2nd/3rd, (OR 3.05 (1.68-5.53); and 2nd-6th measurements, (OR 2.58 (1.22-5.44). Nonhypertensive participants with a WCE were more likely to have a ssIAD on their first measurement (OR 3.82 (1.77 to -8.25) only. ssIAD prevalence does not vary with ethnicity regardless of hypertensive status but is affected by the number of readings, suggesting the influence of WCE. Multiple readings should be used to confirm ssIADs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 14 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 21%
Lecturer 2 14%
Student > Master 2 14%
Student > Postgraduate 2 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 7%
Other 4 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 64%
Unspecified 3 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 May 2017.
All research outputs
#2,427,051
of 9,787,859 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Hypertension (Science Direct)
#248
of 989 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,216
of 263,716 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Hypertension (Science Direct)
#14
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,787,859 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 989 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,716 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.