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Effect of solvents extraction on phytochemical components and biological activities of Tunisian date seeds (var. Korkobbi and Arechti)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, May 2017
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Title
Effect of solvents extraction on phytochemical components and biological activities of Tunisian date seeds (var. Korkobbi and Arechti)
Published in
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12906-017-1751-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amira Thouri, Hassiba Chahdoura, Amira El Arem, Amel Omri Hichri, Rihab Ben Hassin, Lotfi Achour

Abstract

The interest in natural antioxidants, especially polyphenols, is growing more and more thanks to their positive contribution to human health. Thus, the prevention from the harmful action of oxidative stress which has been involved in many diseases such as cancer, inflammation diabetes, and cardiovascular illness. Recent research proved the bioactive compounds richness of date seeds which could be a good biological matrix of natural antioxidants. Unfortunately, an important quantity of Tunisian dates seed is discarded yearly. In this study, different solvents extraction (water, methanol, absolute acetone and aqueous acetone 80%) were used and the evaluation of its effect on phytochemical level, in vitro antioxidant activities, in vitro hyperglycemia key enzymes inhibition and in vivo anti-inflammatory proprieties were established for Tunisian date seeds. The result revealed that the polar solvent exhibited the highest amount of bioactive compounds. The correlation between polyphenol compounds and the antioxidant potentiality explains the powerful effect of used polar solvents on inflammation, TBARS and hyperglycemia inhibition. Furthermore, it showed its higher capacity to scavenge radicals. Therefore, this big waste of Tunisian seeds could be used as cheap source of natural antioxidant compounds which are considered as a health challenge for the poor countries.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 67 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 16 24%
Student > Master 9 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 13%
Researcher 5 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 7 10%
Unknown 17 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 9%
Chemistry 5 7%
Chemical Engineering 3 4%
Other 13 19%
Unknown 19 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 May 2017.
All research outputs
#7,540,478
of 9,782,970 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#1,615
of 2,316 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#188,596
of 264,192 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#25
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,782,970 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,316 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,192 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.