↓ Skip to main content

Association Between Breast Milk Bacterial Communities and Establishment and Development of the Infant Gut Microbiome

Overview of attention for article published in JAMA Pediatrics, July 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
32 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
269 tweeters
facebook
80 Facebook pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users
reddit
2 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
203 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
488 Mendeley
Title
Association Between Breast Milk Bacterial Communities and Establishment and Development of the Infant Gut Microbiome
Published in
JAMA Pediatrics, July 2017
DOI 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.0378
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pia S. Pannaraj, Fan Li, Chiara Cerini, Jeffrey M. Bender, Shangxin Yang, Adrienne Rollie, Helty Adisetiyo, Sara Zabih, Pamela J. Lincez, Kyle Bittinger, Aubrey Bailey, Frederic D. Bushman, John W. Sleasman, Grace M. Aldrovandi

Abstract

Establishment of the infant microbiome has lifelong implications on health and immunity. Gut microbiota of breastfed compared with nonbreastfed individuals differ during infancy as well as into adulthood. Breast milk contains a diverse population of bacteria, but little is known about the vertical transfer of bacteria from mother to infant by breastfeeding. To determine the association between the maternal breast milk and areolar skin and infant gut bacterial communities. In a prospective, longitudinal study, bacterial composition was identified with sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene in breast milk, areolar skin, and infant stool samples of 107 healthy mother-infant pairs. The study was conducted in Los Angeles, California, and St Petersburg, Florida, between January 1, 2010, and February 28, 2015. Amount and duration of daily breastfeeding and timing of solid food introduction. Bacterial composition in maternal breast milk, areolar skin, and infant stool by sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. In the 107 healthy mother and infant pairs (median age at the time of specimen collection, 40 days; range, 1-331 days), 52 (43.0%) of the infants were male. Bacterial communities were distinct in milk, areolar skin, and stool, differing in both composition and diversity. The infant gut microbial communities were more closely related to an infant's mother's milk and skin compared with a random mother (mean difference in Bray-Curtis distances, 0.012 and 0.014, respectively; P < .001 for both). Source tracking analysis was used to estimate the contribution of the breast milk and areolar skin microbiomes to the infant gut microbiome. During the first 30 days of life, infants who breastfed to obtain 75% or more of their daily milk intake received a mean (SD) of 27.7% (15.2%) of the bacteria from breast milk and 10.3% (6.0%) from areolar skin. Bacterial diversity (Faith phylogenetic diversity, P = .003) and composition changes were associated with the proportion of daily breast milk intake in a dose-dependent manner, even after the introduction of solid foods. The results of this study indicate that bacteria in mother's breast milk seed the infant gut, underscoring the importance of breastfeeding in the development of the infant gut microbiome.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 269 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 488 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Greece 1 <1%
Unknown 483 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 87 18%
Student > Master 84 17%
Researcher 77 16%
Student > Bachelor 67 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 25 5%
Other 77 16%
Unknown 71 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 104 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 79 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 70 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 48 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 44 9%
Other 48 10%
Unknown 95 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 474. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 March 2020.
All research outputs
#21,374
of 14,568,517 outputs
Outputs from JAMA Pediatrics
#93
of 2,391 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#962
of 265,467 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JAMA Pediatrics
#5
of 67 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,568,517 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,391 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 87.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,467 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 67 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.