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Identification of Tp0751 (Pallilysin) as a Treponema pallidum Vascular Adhesin by Heterologous Expression in the Lyme disease Spirochete

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, May 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

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23 X users
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1 Google+ user

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Title
Identification of Tp0751 (Pallilysin) as a Treponema pallidum Vascular Adhesin by Heterologous Expression in the Lyme disease Spirochete
Published in
Scientific Reports, May 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-01589-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wei-Chien Andrew Kao, Helena Pětrošová, Rhodaba Ebady, Karen V. Lithgow, Pablo Rojas, Yang Zhang, Yae-Eun Kim, Yae-Ram Kim, Tanya Odisho, Nupur Gupta, Annette Moter, Caroline E. Cameron, Tara J. Moriarty

Abstract

Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, is a highly invasive spirochete pathogen that uses the vasculature to disseminate throughout the body. Identification of bacterial factors promoting dissemination is crucial for syphilis vaccine development. An important step in dissemination is bacterial adhesion to blood vessel surfaces, a process mediated by bacterial proteins that can withstand forces imposed on adhesive bonds by blood flow (vascular adhesins). The study of T. pallidum vascular adhesins is hindered by the uncultivable nature of this pathogen. We overcame these limitations by expressing T. pallidum adhesin Tp0751 (pallilysin) in an adhesion-attenuated strain of the cultivable spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Under fluid shear stress representative of conditions in postcapillary venules, Tp0751 restored bacterial-vascular interactions to levels similar to those observed for infectious B. burgdorferi and a gain-of-function strain expressing B. burgdorferi vascular adhesin BBK32. The strength and stability of Tp0751- and BBK32-dependent endothelial interactions under physiological shear stress were similar, although the mechanisms stabilizing these interactions were distinct. Tp0751 expression also permitted bacteria to interact with postcapillary venules in live mice as effectively as BBK32-expressing strains. These results demonstrate that Tp0751 can function as a vascular adhesin.

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The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 23 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 18%
Student > Bachelor 6 16%
Other 5 13%
Student > Master 4 11%
Professor 3 8%
Other 6 16%
Unknown 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 16%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Other 6 16%
Unknown 11 29%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2019.
All research outputs
#2,466,146
of 25,870,142 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#21,870
of 143,616 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43,781
of 328,359 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#647
of 4,071 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,870,142 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 143,616 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 328,359 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,071 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.