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Effects on circulating steroid hormones and gene expression along the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis in adult Japanese quail exposed to 17β-trenbolone across multiple generations

Overview of attention for article published in Toxicological Sciences, January 2017
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Title
Effects on circulating steroid hormones and gene expression along the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis in adult Japanese quail exposed to 17β-trenbolone across multiple generations
Published in
Toxicological Sciences, January 2017
DOI 10.1093/toxsci/kfx016
Pubmed ID
Authors

Natalie K. Karouna-Renier, Yu Chen, Paula F. P. Henry, Catherine M. Maddox, Daniel T. Sprague

Abstract

We investigated the effects of the androgenic growth promoter 17ß-trenbolone (17βTB) on adult Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) exposed across three generations. The F0 generation was exposed after sexual maturity to 0, 1, 5, 10, 20, and 40 ppm through feed. The F1 generation was exposed in ovo by maternal transfer and through feed at the same doses as their parents. The F2 generation was exposed in ovo only. Levels of plasma sex steroids, gonadal Cytochrome P450 aromatase (CYP19A1) mRNA and select brain neuroendocrine peptide mRNAs were measured. In males, testosterone levels did not differ in any generation from those in controls. Estradiol was significantly elevated in 17βTB treated F0 and F1 males. In F0 and F1 females, testosterone was suppressed by 17βTB, whereas estradiol was significantly higher at 40 ppm in F0 and at 10 ppm in F1 females. CYP19A1expression in F1 males and females increased suggesting a compensatory response to the androgenic effects of 17βTB. Few significant effects were observed in the F2 birds indicating that in ovo exposure had limited effects on the monitored endpoints. Overall, our results confirmed endocrine disrupting effects of dietary 17βTB in Japanese quail but the response was dependent on sex, developmental stage at initiation of exposure, and dose.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 2 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 17%
Student > Master 2 17%
Other 1 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Unknown 3 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 25%
Environmental Science 3 25%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 May 2017.
All research outputs
#7,547,940
of 9,792,785 outputs
Outputs from Toxicological Sciences
#2,875
of 3,187 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#188,609
of 264,201 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Toxicological Sciences
#64
of 75 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,792,785 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,187 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 75 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.