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The involvement of alcohol in hospital-treated self-harm and associated factors: findings from two national registries

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Public Health, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
30 Mendeley
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Title
The involvement of alcohol in hospital-treated self-harm and associated factors: findings from two national registries
Published in
Journal of Public Health, May 2017
DOI 10.1093/pubmed/fdx049
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eve Griffin, Ella Arensman, Ivan J Perry, Brendan Bonner, Denise O’Hagan, Caroline Daly, Paul Corcoran

Abstract

Alcohol is often involved in hospital-treated self-harm. Therefore it is important to establish the role of alcohol in self-harm as well as to identify associated factors, in order to best inform service provision. Data on self-harm presentations to hospital emergency departments in Ireland and Northern Ireland from April 2012 to December 2013 were analysed. We calculated the prevalence of alcohol consumption in self-harm. Using Poisson regression models, we identified the factors associated with having consumed alcohol at the time of a self-harm act. Alcohol was present in 43% of all self-harm acts, and more common in Northern Ireland (50 versus 37%). The factors associated with alcohol being involved were being male, aged between 25 and 64 years, and having engaged in a drug overdose or attempted drowning. Presentations made out-of-hours were more likely to have alcohol present and this was more pronounced for females. Patients with alcohol on board were also more likely to leave without having been seen by a clinician. This study has highlighted the prevalence of alcohol in self-harm presentations, and has identified factors associated with presentations involving alcohol. Appropriate out-of-hours services in emergency departments for self-harm presentations could reduce the proportion of presentations leaving without being seen by a clinician and facilitate improved outcomes for patients.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 29 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 17%
Other 5 17%
Student > Master 3 10%
Unspecified 3 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Other 6 20%
Unknown 6 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 27%
Psychology 7 23%
Unspecified 3 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 10%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 6 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 May 2017.
All research outputs
#2,016,789
of 9,896,588 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Public Health
#477
of 1,459 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#69,628
of 263,871 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Public Health
#28
of 44 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,896,588 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 79th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,459 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,871 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 44 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.