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How Should Clinicians Respond to Transference Reactions with Cancer Patients?

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, May 2017
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6 tweeters

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Title
How Should Clinicians Respond to Transference Reactions with Cancer Patients?
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, May 2017
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2017.19.5.ecas3-1705
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Patients with cancer can feel particularly vulnerable and need special attention and support, so clinicians' attention to transference reactions-theirs and their patients-is especially important. Mismanaged transference reactions can undermine the therapeutic alliance in the patient-clinician relationship and negatively influence treatment outcomes. In oncology settings, real and perceived needs of patients in serious distress can occasion modification of usual outpatient protocols, particularly when flexible scheduling or home or hospital visits are warranted. Here, we comment on a case in which transference reactions of a young woman with cancer prompt her to terminate treatment. We discuss the importance of clinicians' recognizing and managing transference and countertransference, maintaining boundaries, and responding with empathy and integrity to cancer patients' concerns.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 33%
Student > Master 2 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Researcher 1 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Unknown 2 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 33%
Psychology 2 17%
Sports and Recreations 1 8%
Social Sciences 1 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Unknown 2 17%