↓ Skip to main content

Comparison of the Legionella pneumophila population structure as determined by sequence-based typing and whole genome sequencing

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, January 2013
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
33 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
51 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Comparison of the Legionella pneumophila population structure as determined by sequence-based typing and whole genome sequencing
Published in
BMC Microbiology, January 2013
DOI 10.1186/1471-2180-13-302
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anthony P Underwood, Garan Jones, Massimo Mentasti, Norman K Fry, Timothy G Harrison

Abstract

Legionella pneumophila is an opportunistic pathogen of humans where the source of infection is usually from contaminated man-made water systems. When an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease caused by L. pneumophila occurs, it is necessary to discover the source of infection. A seven allele sequence-based typing scheme (SBT) has been very successful in providing the means to attribute outbreaks of L. pneumophila to a particular source or sources. Particular sequence types described by this scheme are known to exhibit specific phenotypes. For instance some types are seen often in clinical cases but are rarely isolated from the environment and vice versa. Of those causing human disease some types are thought to be more likely to cause more severe disease. It is possible that the genetic basis for these differences are vertically inherited and associated with particular genetic lineages within the population. In order to provide a framework within which to test this hypothesis and others relating to the population biology of L. pneumophila, a set of genomes covering the known diversity of the organism is required.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 2%
Germany 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Denmark 1 2%
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 46 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 35%
Researcher 12 24%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Student > Master 3 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 6%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 4 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 43%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 16%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 9 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 January 2014.
All research outputs
#2,298,412
of 10,612,958 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#288
of 1,583 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,129
of 194,447 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#12
of 50 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,612,958 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,583 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 194,447 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 50 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.