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Prefrontal cortical glutathione-dependent defense and proinflammatory mediators in chronically isolated rats: Modulation by fluoxetine or clozapine

Overview of attention for article published in Neuroscience, July 2017
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Title
Prefrontal cortical glutathione-dependent defense and proinflammatory mediators in chronically isolated rats: Modulation by fluoxetine or clozapine
Published in
Neuroscience, July 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2017.04.044
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nevena Todorović, Dragana Filipović

Abstract

Chronic psychosocial stress modulates brain antioxidant systems and causes neuroinflammation that play role in the pathophysiology of depression. Although the antidepressant fluoxetine (FLX) represents the first-line treatment for depression and the atypical antipsychotic clozapine (CLZ) is considered as a second-line treatment for psychotic disorders, the downstream mechanisms of action of these treatments, beyond serotonergic or dopaminergic signaling, remain elusive. We examined behavioral changes, glutathione (GSH)-dependent defense and levels of proinflammatory mediators in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of adult male Wistar rats exposed to 21 days of chronic social isolation (CSIS). We also tested the ability of FLX (15 mg/kg/day) or CLZ (20 mg/kg/day), applied during CSIS, to prevent stress-induced changes. CSIS caused depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors, compromised GSH-dependent defense, and induced nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation with a concomitant increase in cytosolic levels of proinflammatory mediators cyclooxigenase-2, interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in the PFC. NF-κB activation and proinflammatory response in the PFC were not found in CSIS rats treated with FLX or CLZ. In contrast, only FLX preserved GSH content in CSIS rats. CLZ not only failed to protect against CSIS-induced GSH depletion, but it diminished its levels when applied to non-stressed rats. In conclusion, prefrontal cortical GSH depletion and the proinflammatory response underlying depressive- and anxiety-like states induced by CSIS were prevented by FLX. The protective effect of CLZ, which was equally effective as FLX on the behavioral level, was limited to proinflammatory components. Hence, different mechanisms underlie the protective effects of these two drugs in CSIS rats.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 13%
Researcher 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Student > Master 4 9%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 12 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 17%
Neuroscience 7 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 9%
Psychology 4 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 9%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 14 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 May 2017.
All research outputs
#9,816,270
of 12,290,236 outputs
Outputs from Neuroscience
#4,371
of 5,518 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#190,526
of 266,284 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuroscience
#93
of 130 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,290,236 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,518 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,284 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 130 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.