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Are computer and cell phone use associated with body mass index and overweight? A population study among twin adolescents

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, February 2007
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

dimensions_citation
69 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
150 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Are computer and cell phone use associated with body mass index and overweight? A population study among twin adolescents
Published in
BMC Public Health, February 2007
DOI 10.1186/1471-2458-7-24
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hanna-Reetta Lajunen, Anna Keski-Rahkonen, Lea Pulkkinen, Richard J Rose, Aila Rissanen, Jaakko Kaprio

Abstract

Overweight in children and adolescents has reached dimensions of a global epidemic during recent years. Simultaneously, information and communication technology use has rapidly increased. A population-based sample of Finnish twins born in 1983-1987 (N = 4098) was assessed by self-report questionnaires at 17 y during 2000-2005. The association of overweight (defined by Cole's BMI-for-age cut-offs) with computer and cell phone use and ownership was analyzed by logistic regression and their association with BMI by linear regression models. The effect of twinship was taken into account by correcting for clustered sampling of families. All models were adjusted for gender, physical exercise, and parents' education and occupational class. The proportion of adolescents who did not have a computer at home decreased from 18% to 8% from 2000 to 2005. Compared to them, having a home computer (without an Internet connection) was associated with a higher risk of overweight (odds ratio 2.3, 95% CI 1.4 to 3.8) and BMI (beta coefficient 0.57, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.98). However, having a computer with an Internet connection was not associated with weight status. Belonging to the highest quintile (OR 1.8 95% CI 1.2 to 2.8) and second-highest quintile (OR 1.6 95% CI 1.1 to 2.4) of weekly computer use was positively associated with overweight. The proportion of adolescents without a personal cell phone decreased from 12% to 1% across 2000 to 2005. There was a positive linear trend of increasing monthly phone bill with BMI (beta 0.18, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.30), but the association of a cell phone bill with overweight was very weak. Time spent using a home computer was associated with an increased risk of overweight. Cell phone use correlated weakly with BMI. Increasing use of information and communication technology may be related to the obesity epidemic among adolescents.

Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 150 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Greece 1 <1%
Unknown 141 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 24 16%
Student > Master 22 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 12%
Researcher 13 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 9%
Other 30 20%
Unknown 30 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 37 25%
Social Sciences 13 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 8%
Psychology 11 7%
Sports and Recreations 6 4%
Other 35 23%
Unknown 36 24%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 October 2022.
All research outputs
#6,089,280
of 23,466,057 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#6,236
of 15,293 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,766
of 77,134 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#8
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,466,057 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 15,293 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 77,134 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.