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Family network size and survival across the lifespan of female macaques

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
75 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
87 Mendeley
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Title
Family network size and survival across the lifespan of female macaques
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, May 2017
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2017.0515
Pubmed ID
Authors

L. J. N. Brent, A. Ruiz-Lambides, M. L. Platt

Abstract

Two decades of research suggest social relationships have a common evolutionary basis in humans and other gregarious mammals. Critical to the support of this idea is growing evidence that mortality is influenced by social integration, but when these effects emerge and how long they last is mostly unknown. Here, we report in adult female macaques that the impact of number of close adult female relatives, a proxy for social integration, on survival is not experienced uniformly across the life course; prime-aged females with a greater number of relatives had better survival outcomes compared with prime-aged females with fewer relatives, whereas no such effect was found in older females. Group size and dominance rank did not influence this result. Older females were less frequent targets of aggression, suggesting enhanced experience navigating the social landscape may obviate the need for social relationships in old age. Only one study of humans has found age-based dependency in the association between social integration and survival. Using the largest dataset for any non-human animal to date, our study extends support for the idea that sociality promotes survival and suggests strategies employed across the life course change along with experience of the social world.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 75 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 87 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 85 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 30%
Student > Master 11 13%
Researcher 10 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 11%
Unspecified 9 10%
Other 21 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 33 38%
Psychology 17 20%
Unspecified 14 16%
Social Sciences 8 9%
Environmental Science 7 8%
Other 8 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 64. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 August 2019.
All research outputs
#278,223
of 13,769,914 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#847
of 7,645 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,644
of 264,012 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#25
of 148 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,769,914 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,645 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 29.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,012 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 148 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.