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Retirement investment theory explains patterns in songbird nest-site choice

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, February 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

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83 Mendeley
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Title
Retirement investment theory explains patterns in songbird nest-site choice
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, February 2014
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2013.1834
Pubmed ID
Authors

Henry M. Streby, Jeanine M. Refsnider, Sean M. Peterson, David E. Andersen

Abstract

When opposing evolutionary selection pressures act on a behavioural trait, the result is often stabilizing selection for an intermediate optimal phenotype, with deviations from the predicted optimum attributed to tracking a moving target, development of behavioural syndromes or shifts in riskiness over an individual's lifetime. We investigated nest-site choice by female golden-winged warblers, and the selection pressures acting on that choice by two fitness components, nest success and fledgling survival. We observed strong and consistent opposing selection pressures on nest-site choice for maximizing these two fitness components, and an abrupt, within-season switch in the fitness component birds prioritize via nest-site choice, dependent on the time remaining for additional nesting attempts. We found that females consistently deviated from the predicted optimal behaviour when choosing nest sites because they can make multiple attempts at one fitness component, nest success, but only one attempt at the subsequent component, fledgling survival. Our results demonstrate a unique natural strategy for balancing opposing selection pressures to maximize total fitness. This time-dependent switch from high to low risk tolerance in nest-site choice maximizes songbird fitness in the same way a well-timed switch in human investor risk tolerance can maximize one's nest egg at retirement. Our results also provide strong evidence for the adaptive nature of songbird nest-site choice, which we suggest has been elusive primarily due to a lack of consideration for fledgling survival.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 4%
United Kingdom 1 1%
South Africa 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 77 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 22%
Researcher 16 19%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 6%
Student > Bachelor 4 5%
Other 9 11%
Unknown 9 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 47 57%
Environmental Science 13 16%
Psychology 4 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 1%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 1%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 15 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 February 2014.
All research outputs
#10,123,408
of 18,812,327 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#7,516
of 9,058 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#125,679
of 284,755 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#116
of 142 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,812,327 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,058 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 36.8. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 284,755 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 142 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.