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Adjustment of carbon fluxes to light conditions regulates the daily turnover of starch in plants: a computational model

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular BioSystems, January 2014
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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37 Dimensions

Readers on

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81 Mendeley
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Title
Adjustment of carbon fluxes to light conditions regulates the daily turnover of starch in plants: a computational model
Published in
Molecular BioSystems, January 2014
DOI 10.1039/c3mb70459a
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexandra Pokhilko, Anna Flis, Ronan Sulpice, Mark Stitt, Oliver Ebenhöh

Abstract

In the light, photosynthesis provides carbon for metabolism and growth. In the dark, plant growth depends on carbon reserves that were accumulated during previous light periods. Many plants accumulate part of their newly-fixed carbon as starch in their leaves in the day and remobilise it to support metabolism and growth at night. The daily rhythms of starch accumulation and degradation are dynamically adjusted to the changing light conditions such that starch is almost but not totally exhausted at dawn. This requires the allocation of a larger proportion of the newly fixed carbon to starch under low carbon conditions, and the use of information about the carbon status at the end of the light period and the length of the night to pace the rate of starch degradation. This regulation occurs in a circadian clock-dependent manner, through unknown mechanisms. We use mathematical modelling to explore possible diurnal mechanisms regulating the starch level. Our model combines the main reactions of carbon fixation, starch and sucrose synthesis, starch degradation and consumption of carbon by sink tissues. To describe the dynamic adjustment of starch to daily conditions, we introduce diurnal regulators of carbon fluxes, which modulate the activities of the key steps of starch metabolism. The sensing of the diurnal conditions is mediated in our model by the timer α and the "dark sensor"β, which integrate daily information about the light conditions and time of the day through the circadian clock. Our data identify the β subunit of SnRK1 kinase as a good candidate for the role of the dark-accumulated component β of our model. The developed novel approach for understanding starch kinetics through diurnal metabolic and circadian sensors allowed us to explain starch time-courses in plants and predict the kinetics of the proposed diurnal regulators under various genetic and environmental perturbations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 81 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 1%
Singapore 1 1%
Unknown 77 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 24 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 28%
Student > Master 7 9%
Professor 6 7%
Student > Postgraduate 5 6%
Other 11 14%
Unknown 5 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 51 63%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 16%
Unspecified 2 2%
Engineering 2 2%
Mathematics 1 1%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 8 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 March 2014.
All research outputs
#2,719,060
of 6,574,878 outputs
Outputs from Molecular BioSystems
#294
of 970 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63,806
of 157,310 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular BioSystems
#7
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,574,878 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 56th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 970 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 157,310 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.