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Drawing a line in the sand: Effectiveness of off-highway vehicle management in California's Sonoran desert

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Environmental Management, May 2017
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Title
Drawing a line in the sand: Effectiveness of off-highway vehicle management in California's Sonoran desert
Published in
Journal of Environmental Management, May 2017
DOI 10.1016/j.jenvman.2017.02.033
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nathan A. Custer, Lesley A. DeFalco, Kenneth E. Nussear, Todd C. Esque

Abstract

Public land policies manage multiple uses while striving to protect vulnerable plant and wildlife habitats from degradation; yet the effectiveness of such policies are infrequently evaluated, particularly for remote landscapes that are difficult to monitor. We assessed the use and impacts of recreational vehicles on Mojave Desert washes (intermittent streams) in the Chemehuevi Desert Wildlife Management Area (DWMA) of southern California. Wash zones designated as open and closed to off-highway vehicle (OHV) activity were designed in part to protect Mojave desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) habitat while allowing recreation in designated areas. OHV tracks were monitored in washes located near access roads during winter and early spring holidays - when recreation is typically high - and at randomly dispersed locations away from roads. Washes near access roads had fewer vehicle tracks within closed than open zones; further away from roads, OHV tracks were infrequent and their occurrence was not different between wash designations. Washes were in better condition in closed zones following major holidays as indicated by less vegetation damage, presence of trash, and wash bank damage. Furthermore, the frequency of washes with live tortoises and their sign was marginally greater in closed than open wash zones. Collectively, these results suggest that low impacts to habitats in designated closed wash zones reflect public compliance with federal OHV policy and regulations in the Chemehuevi DWMA during our study. Future monitoring to contrast wash use and impacts during other seasons as well as in other DWMAs will elucidate spatial and temporal patterns of recreation in these important conservation areas.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 23%
Other 2 15%
Researcher 2 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Lecturer 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Unknown 3 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 38%
Computer Science 2 15%
Environmental Science 1 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 8%
Engineering 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 May 2017.
All research outputs
#10,826,096
of 12,211,426 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Environmental Management
#1,765
of 2,008 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#225,985
of 269,443 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Environmental Management
#61
of 76 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,211,426 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,008 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,443 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 76 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.