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Effect of Intermittent Cold Exposure on Brown Fat Activation, Obesity, and Energy Homeostasis in Mice

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
43 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
57 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
136 Mendeley
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Title
Effect of Intermittent Cold Exposure on Brown Fat Activation, Obesity, and Energy Homeostasis in Mice
Published in
PLoS ONE, January 2014
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0085876
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yann Ravussin, Cuiying Xiao, Oksana Gavrilova, Marc L. Reitman

Abstract

Homeotherms have specific mechanisms to maintain a constant core body temperature despite changes in thermal environment, food supply, and metabolic demand. Brown adipose tissue, the principal thermogenic organ, quickly and efficiently increases heat production by dissipating the mitochondrial proton motive force. It has been suggested that activation of brown fat, via either environmental (i.e. cold exposure) or pharmacologic means, could be used to increase metabolic rate and thus reduce body weight. Here we assess the effects of intermittent cold exposure (4°C for one to eight hours three times a week) on C57BL/6J mice fed a high fat diet. Cold exposure increased metabolic rate approximately two-fold during the challenge and activated brown fat. In response, food intake increased to compensate fully for the increased energy expenditure; thus, the mice showed no reduction in body weight or adiposity. Despite the unchanged adiposity, the cold-treated mice showed transient improvements in glucose homeostasis. Administration of the cannabinoid receptor-1 inverse agonist AM251 caused weight loss and improvements in glucose homeostasis, but showed no further improvements when combined with cold exposure. These data suggest that intermittent cold exposure causes transient, meaningful improvements in glucose homeostasis, but without synergy when combined with AM251. Since energy expenditure is significantly increased during cold exposure, a drug that dissociates food intake from metabolic demand during cold exposure may achieve weight loss and further metabolic improvements.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 43 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 136 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 3%
Kenya 1 <1%
Unknown 131 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 21%
Researcher 23 17%
Student > Master 19 14%
Student > Bachelor 17 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 7%
Other 29 21%
Unknown 10 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 41 30%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 24 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 15%
Sports and Recreations 5 4%
Neuroscience 4 3%
Other 23 17%
Unknown 18 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 80. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 November 2019.
All research outputs
#232,036
of 14,244,653 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#4,334
of 148,583 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,873
of 247,741 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#221
of 8,109 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,244,653 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 148,583 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 247,741 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8,109 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.