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Student perspectives of a Student-Led Groups Program model of professional practice education in a brain injury rehabilitation unit

Overview of attention for article published in Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
20 Mendeley
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Title
Student perspectives of a Student-Led Groups Program model of professional practice education in a brain injury rehabilitation unit
Published in
Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, April 2017
DOI 10.1111/1440-1630.12382
Pubmed ID
Authors

Freyr Patterson, Jennifer Fleming, Kathryn Marshall, Nadine Ninness

Abstract

Professional practice education is a core and essential component of occupational therapy training. With increasing numbers of education programmes and more students requiring professional practice placements, development of innovative models of professional practice education has emerged, but these require investigation. The aim of this study was to investigate student experiences and perceptions of the Student-Led Groups Program model of professional practice education in an inpatient brain injury rehabilitation unit. A qualitative approach, guided by phenomenological theory was used. Participants were 15 students who had completed a professional practice placement in the Student-Led Groups Program. Data were collected using in-depth semi-structured interviews and analysed thematically. Three over-arching themes emerged from the data; balance of support and freedom, development of clinical skills and missed opportunities. Students described how the structure of the placement facilitated independent learning and autonomy that was balanced with support from clinicians and student peers. Students perceived that they had developed a breadth of clinical skills and also had missed some learning opportunities in this professional practice placement structure. Overall student perceptions of the Student-Led Groups Program were positive, supporting the continued use of this model of professional practice education in this setting. The results highlight the value of structured and consistent approaches for supervision, including the use of formal approaches to peer supervision in the initial stages of learning.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 5%
Unknown 19 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 20%
Student > Master 4 20%
Researcher 2 10%
Other 2 10%
Other 3 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 7 35%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 10%
Engineering 2 10%
Psychology 1 5%
Other 4 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 June 2017.
All research outputs
#6,398,801
of 12,352,171 outputs
Outputs from Australian Occupational Therapy Journal
#170
of 368 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#104,526
of 272,080 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Australian Occupational Therapy Journal
#8
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,352,171 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 368 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,080 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.