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Changing climate and the altitudinal range of avian malaria in the Hawaiian Islands – an ongoing conservation crisis on the island of Kaua'i

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, February 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
18 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
51 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
134 Mendeley
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Title
Changing climate and the altitudinal range of avian malaria in the Hawaiian Islands – an ongoing conservation crisis on the island of Kaua'i
Published in
Global Change Biology, February 2014
DOI 10.1111/gcb.12535
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carter T. Atkinson, Ruth B. Utzurrum, Dennis A. Lapointe, Richard J. Camp, Lisa H. Crampton, Jeffrey T. Foster, Thomas W. Giambelluca

Abstract

Transmission of avian malaria in the Hawaiian Islands varies across altitudinal gradients and is greatest at elevations below 1500 m where both temperature and moisture are favorable for the sole mosquito vector, Culex quinquefasciatus, and extrinsic sporogonic development of the parasite, Plasmodium relictum. Potential consequences of global warming on this system have been recognized for over a decade with concerns that increases in mean temperatures could lead to expansion of malaria into habitats where cool temperatures currently limit transmission to highly susceptible endemic forest birds. Recent declines in two endangered species on the island of Kaua'i, the 'Akikiki (Oreomystis bairdi) and 'Akeke'e (Loxops caeruleirostris), and retreat of more common native honeycreepers to the last remaining high elevation habitat on the Alaka'i Plateau suggest that predicted changes in disease transmission may be occurring. We compared prevalence of malarial infections in forest birds that were sampled at three locations on the Plateau during 1994-1997 and again during 2007-2013, and also evaluated changes in the occurrence of mosquito larvae in available aquatic habitats during the same time periods. Prevalence of infection increased significantly at the lower (1100 m, 10.3% to 28.2%), middle (1250 m, 8.4% to 12.2%), and upper ends of the Plateau (1350 m, 2.0% to 19.3%). A concurrent increase in detections of Culex larvae in aquatic habitats associated with stream margins indicates that populations of the vector are also increasing. These increases are at least in part due to local transmission because overall prevalence in Kaua'i 'Elepaio (Chasiempis sclateri), a sedentary native species, has increased from 17.2% to 27.0%. Increasing mean air temperatures, declining precipitation, and changes in streamflow that have taken place over the past 20 years are creating environmental conditions throughout major portions of the Alaka'i Plateau that support increased transmission of avian malaria.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 134 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
Lithuania 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 127 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 22%
Researcher 25 19%
Student > Master 19 14%
Student > Bachelor 18 13%
Student > Postgraduate 6 4%
Other 20 15%
Unknown 17 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 65 49%
Environmental Science 20 15%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 4%
Social Sciences 4 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 3%
Other 16 12%
Unknown 20 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 69. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 September 2019.
All research outputs
#328,213
of 15,899,905 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#361
of 4,351 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,958
of 256,585 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#12
of 80 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,899,905 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,351 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 256,585 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 80 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.