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Female monopolization mediates the relationship between pre- and postcopulatory sexual traits

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
99 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
160 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Female monopolization mediates the relationship between pre- and postcopulatory sexual traits
Published in
Nature Communications, January 2014
DOI 10.1038/ncomms4184
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stefan Lüpold, Joseph L. Tomkins, Leigh W. Simmons, John L. Fitzpatrick

Abstract

Theory predicts a trade-off between investments in precopulatory (ornaments and armaments) and postcopulatory (testes and ejaculates) sexual traits due to the costs associated with their growth and maintenance within the finite energy resources available. Empirical studies, however, have revealed considerable inconsistency in the strength and direction of relationships among these sexual traits. Ambiguity may result from variance in the marginal benefits gained by increasing investments in either pre- or postcopulatory sexual traits. Here, in a broad comparative study, we test the prediction that the relationship between pre- and postcopulatory sexual traits differs among taxa relative to the importance of male-male contest competition within them. We find that covariance between pre- and postcopulatory sexual traits gradually shifts from strongly positive to strongly negative with increasing male-male contest competition. Thus, our findings reveal a potentially unifying explanation for the oftentimes inconsistent relationships in the strength and direction of covariance among sexual traits.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 160 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 2 1%
United Kingdom 2 1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Romania 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 151 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 37 23%
Researcher 31 19%
Student > Bachelor 25 16%
Student > Master 21 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 6%
Other 19 12%
Unknown 18 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 112 70%
Environmental Science 7 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 3%
Social Sciences 3 2%
Psychology 2 1%
Other 6 4%
Unknown 25 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 115. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 December 2015.
All research outputs
#260,086
of 20,597,902 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#4,197
of 40,849 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,912
of 281,303 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#2
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,597,902 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 40,849 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 54.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,303 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.