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Serological and molecular detection of spotted fever group Rickettsia in a group of pet dogs from Luanda, Angola

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, May 2017
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Title
Serological and molecular detection of spotted fever group Rickettsia in a group of pet dogs from Luanda, Angola
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13071-017-2216-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Patrícia F. Barradas, Hugo Vilhena, Ana Cristina Oliveira, Sara Granada, Irina Amorim, Paula Ferreira, Luís Cardoso, Fátima Gärtner, Rita de Sousa

Abstract

Infections with tick-borne rickettsiae can cause diseases well known in humans but still not so well characterized in dogs. Susceptibility to infection depends on the virulence of Rickettsia spp. and only a few of them have been described to cause disease in dogs. The aim of this study was to investigate the exposure to Rickettsia spp. among a group of pet dogs from Luanda, Angola. Out of 103 dogs included in the study, 62 (60.2%) were infested with ticks. Plasma specimens tested for serology by an immunofluorescence assay (IFA) revealed that six (5.8%) dogs had detectable immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to spotted fever group Rickettsia (SFGR), with endpoint titers of 64 for two dogs, 128 for three dogs and 1024 for one dog. From the seropositive group of dogs, five (83%) of them were males, with their age ranging from 1 to 8 years old. Among the seropositive dogs, four (66.7%) were parasitized with ticks and no breed (or cross) was found to be associated with specific antibodies. Rickettsia spp. DNA was detected by nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in two (1.9%) dogs that were found to be seronegative. Seroprevalence and molecular detection of Rickettsia spp. infection in this group of pet dogs from Luanda is low compared with other studies performed in the same type of hosts in other areas. Although many dogs were parasitized with ticks, a low prevalence of Rickettsia spp. could be related with the hypothesis of a low rickettsial prevalence in the infesting ticks. This study provides evidence that dogs in Luanda are exposed to Rickettsia spp., but further studies are needed to better characterize the bacterial infections in dogs and in their ectoparasites.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 46%
Researcher 3 13%
Unspecified 3 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 8%
Other 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 29%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 6 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 17%
Unspecified 3 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 8%
Other 2 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 June 2017.
All research outputs
#8,615,850
of 11,218,844 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,837
of 2,813 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#175,105
of 266,427 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#121
of 146 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,218,844 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,813 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 146 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.