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Derived immune and ancestral pigmentation alleles in a 7,000-year-old Mesolithic European

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
76 news outlets
blogs
14 blogs
twitter
311 tweeters
facebook
24 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
13 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
220 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
438 Mendeley
citeulike
5 CiteULike
Title
Derived immune and ancestral pigmentation alleles in a 7,000-year-old Mesolithic European
Published in
Nature, January 2014
DOI 10.1038/nature12960
Pubmed ID
Authors

Iñigo Olalde, Morten E. Allentoft, Federico Sánchez-Quinto, Gabriel Santpere, Charleston W. K. Chiang, Michael DeGiorgio, Javier Prado-Martinez, Juan Antonio Rodríguez, Simon Rasmussen, Javier Quilez, Oscar Ramírez, Urko M. Marigorta, Marcos Fernández-Callejo, María Encina Prada, Julio Manuel Vidal Encinas, Rasmus Nielsen, Mihai G. Netea, John Novembre, Richard A. Sturm, Pardis Sabeti, Tomàs Marquès-Bonet, Arcadi Navarro, Eske Willerslev, Carles Lalueza-Fox

Abstract

Ancient genomic sequences have started to reveal the origin and the demographic impact of farmers from the Neolithic period spreading into Europe. The adoption of farming, stock breeding and sedentary societies during the Neolithic may have resulted in adaptive changes in genes associated with immunity and diet. However, the limited data available from earlier hunter-gatherers preclude an understanding of the selective processes associated with this crucial transition to agriculture in recent human evolution. Here we sequence an approximately 7,000-year-old Mesolithic skeleton discovered at the La Braña-Arintero site in León, Spain, to retrieve a complete pre-agricultural European human genome. Analysis of this genome in the context of other ancient samples suggests the existence of a common ancient genomic signature across western and central Eurasia from the Upper Paleolithic to the Mesolithic. The La Braña individual carries ancestral alleles in several skin pigmentation genes, suggesting that the light skin of modern Europeans was not yet ubiquitous in Mesolithic times. Moreover, we provide evidence that a significant number of derived, putatively adaptive variants associated with pathogen resistance in modern Europeans were already present in this hunter-gatherer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 311 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 438 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 9 2%
Germany 7 2%
United States 7 2%
Spain 2 <1%
Ireland 2 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Other 7 2%
Unknown 400 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 98 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 95 22%
Student > Bachelor 58 13%
Student > Master 38 9%
Other 30 7%
Other 92 21%
Unknown 27 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 203 46%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 73 17%
Arts and Humanities 31 7%
Social Sciences 25 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 4%
Other 54 12%
Unknown 36 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 988. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 June 2020.
All research outputs
#5,899
of 15,381,025 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#862
of 74,495 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#61
of 254,660 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#19
of 937 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,381,025 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 74,495 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 83.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,660 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 937 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.