↓ Skip to main content

Genome complexity in the coelacanth is reflected in its adaptive immune system.

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Experimental Zoology Part B: Molecular and Developmental Evolution, January 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
18 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Genome complexity in the coelacanth is reflected in its adaptive immune system.
Published in
Journal of Experimental Zoology Part B: Molecular and Developmental Evolution, January 2014
DOI 10.1002/jez.b.22558
Pubmed ID
Authors

Saha NR, Ota T, Litman GW, Hansen J, Parra Z, Hsu E, Buonocore F, Canapa A, Cheng JF, Amemiya CT, Saha, Nil Ratan, Ota, Tatsuya, Litman, Gary W., Hansen, John, Parra, Zuly, Hsu, Ellen, Buonocore, Francesco, Canapa, Adriana, Cheng, Jan‐Fang, Amemiya, Chris T.

Abstract

We have analyzed the available genome and transcriptome resources from the coelacanth in order to characterize genes involved in adaptive immunity. Two highly distinctive IgW-encoding loci have been identified that exhibit a unique genomic organization, including a multiplicity of tandemly repeated constant region exons. The overall organization of the IgW loci precludes typical heavy chain class switching. A locus encoding IgM could not be identified either computationally or by using several different experimental strategies. Four distinct sets of genes encoding Ig light chains were identified. This includes a variant sigma-type Ig light chain previously identified only in cartilaginous fishes and which is now provisionally denoted sigma-2. Genes encoding α/β and γ/δ T-cell receptors, and CD3, CD4, and CD8 co-receptors also were characterized. Ig heavy chain variable region genes and TCR components are interspersed within the TCR α/δ locus; this organization previously was reported only in tetrapods and raises questions regarding evolution and functional cooption of genes encoding variable regions. The composition, organization and syntenic conservation of the major histocompatibility complex locus have been characterized. We also identified large numbers of genes encoding cytokines and their receptors, and other genes associated with adaptive immunity. In terms of sequence identity and organization, the adaptive immune genes of the coelacanth more closely resemble orthologous genes in tetrapods than those in teleost fishes, consistent with current phylogenomic interpretations. Overall, the work reported described herein highlights the complexity inherent in the coelacanth genome and provides a rich catalog of immune genes for future investigations. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 9999B: 1-26, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 6%
Unknown 17 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 33%
Student > Master 3 17%
Professor 2 11%
Other 2 11%
Student > Bachelor 2 11%
Other 3 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 67%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 17%
Unspecified 1 6%
Social Sciences 1 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 6%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 May 2015.
All research outputs
#2,786,758
of 6,333,733 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Experimental Zoology Part B: Molecular and Developmental Evolution
#92
of 171 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,294
of 158,043 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Experimental Zoology Part B: Molecular and Developmental Evolution
#2
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,333,733 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 53rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 171 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.2. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 158,043 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.