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Weather, day length and physical activity in older adults: Cross-sectional results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Norfolk Cohort

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, May 2017
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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44 Mendeley
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Title
Weather, day length and physical activity in older adults: Cross-sectional results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Norfolk Cohort
Published in
PLoS ONE, May 2017
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0177767
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yu-Tzu Wu, Robert Luben, Nicholas Wareham, Simon Griffin, Andy P. Jones

Abstract

A wide range of environmental factors have been related to active ageing, but few studies have explored the impact of weather and day length on physical activity in older adults. We investigate the cross-sectional association between weather conditions, day length and activity in older adults using a population-based cohort in England, the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) Norfolk study. Physical activity was measured objectively over 7 days using an accelerometer and this was used to calculate daily total physical activity (counts per minute), daily minutes of sedentary behaviour and light, moderate and vigorous physical activity (LMVPA). Day length and two types of weather conditions, precipitation and temperature, were obtained from a local weather station. The association between these variables and physical activity was examined by multilevel first-order autoregressive modelling. After adjusting for individual factors, short day length and poor weather conditions, including high precipitation and low temperatures, were associated with up to 10% lower average physical activity (p<0.01) and 8 minutes less time spent in LMVPA but 15 minutes more sedentary time, compared to the best conditions. Day length and weather conditions appear to be an important factor related to active ageing. Future work should focus on developing potential interventions to reduce their impact on physical activity behaviours in older adults.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor 11 25%
Student > Master 9 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 14%
Unspecified 5 11%
Researcher 4 9%
Other 9 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 12 27%
Unspecified 8 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 14%
Psychology 5 11%
Social Sciences 4 9%
Other 9 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 August 2017.
All research outputs
#7,213,408
of 11,580,830 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#77,309
of 128,285 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#152,684
of 270,929 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#2,268
of 3,960 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,580,830 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 128,285 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.5. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,929 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,960 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.