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RETRACTED ARTICLE: Stimulus-triggered fate conversion of somatic cells into pluripotency

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#49 of 69,889)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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4257 Mendeley
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18 CiteULike
Title
RETRACTED ARTICLE: Stimulus-triggered fate conversion of somatic cells into pluripotency
Published in
Nature, January 2014
DOI 10.1038/nature12968
Pubmed ID
Authors

Haruko Obokata, Teruhiko Wakayama, Yoshiki Sasai, Koji Kojima, Martin P. Vacanti, Hitoshi Niwa, Masayuki Yamato, Charles A. Vacanti

Abstract

Here we report a unique cellular reprogramming phenomenon, called stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency (STAP), which requires neither nuclear transfer nor the introduction of transcription factors. In STAP, strong external stimuli such as a transient low-pH stressor reprogrammed mammalian somatic cells, resulting in the generation of pluripotent cells. Through real-time imaging of STAP cells derived from purified lymphocytes, as well as gene rearrangement analysis, we found that committed somatic cells give rise to STAP cells by reprogramming rather than selection. STAP cells showed a substantial decrease in DNA methylation in the regulatory regions of pluripotency marker genes. Blastocyst injection showed that STAP cells efficiently contribute to chimaeric embryos and to offspring via germline transmission. We also demonstrate the derivation of robustly expandable pluripotent cell lines from STAP cells. Thus, our findings indicate that epigenetic fate determination of mammalian cells can be markedly converted in a context-dependent manner by strong environmental cues.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2,274 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 4,257 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 134 3%
United States 84 2%
United Kingdom 42 <1%
Germany 24 <1%
France 12 <1%
China 11 <1%
Spain 11 <1%
Brazil 10 <1%
Netherlands 10 <1%
Other 92 2%
Unknown 3827 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 1086 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 963 23%
Student > Master 554 13%
Student > Bachelor 407 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 319 7%
Other 927 22%
Unknown 1 <1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2059 48%
Medicine and Dentistry 585 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 407 10%
Chemistry 228 5%
Unspecified 208 5%
Other 769 18%
Unknown 1 <1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3096. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 August 2019.
All research outputs
#239
of 13,535,875 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#49
of 69,889 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4
of 247,229 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#4
of 930 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,535,875 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 69,889 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 76.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 247,229 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 930 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.