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Antecedents and Consequences of Medical Students' Moral Decision Making during Professionalism Dilemmas

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, June 2017
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29 tweeters

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27 Mendeley
Title
Antecedents and Consequences of Medical Students' Moral Decision Making during Professionalism Dilemmas
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, June 2017
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2017.19.6.medu1-1706
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Medical students often experience professionalism dilemmas (which differ from ethical dilemmas) wherein students sometimes witness and/or participate in patient safety, dignity, and consent lapses. When faced with such dilemmas, students make moral decisions. If students' action (or inaction) runs counter to their perceived moral values-often due to organizational constraints or power hierarchies-they can suffer moral distress, burnout, or a desire to leave the profession. If moral transgressions are rationalized as being for the greater good, moral distress can decrease as dilemmas are experienced more frequently (habituation); if no learner benefit is seen, distress can increase with greater exposure to dilemmas (disturbance). We suggest how medical educators can support students' understandings of ethical dilemmas and facilitate their habits of enacting professionalism: by modeling appropriate resistance behaviors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 29 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 4%
Unknown 26 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 11%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 7%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 9 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 44%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Engineering 1 4%
Unknown 12 44%