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Molecular signatures of neutrophil extracellular traps in human visceral leishmaniasis

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, June 2017
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Title
Molecular signatures of neutrophil extracellular traps in human visceral leishmaniasis
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13071-017-2222-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luiz Gustavo Gardinassi, Thiago S. DeSouza-Vieira, Naila O. da Silva, Gustavo R. Garcia, Valéria M. Borges, Roseane N. S. Campos, Roque P. de Almeida, Isabel K. F. de Miranda Santos, Elvira M. Saraiva

Abstract

Infections with parasites of the Leishmania donovani complex result in clinical outcomes that range from asymptomatic infection to severe and fatal visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Neutrophils are major players of the immune response against Leishmania, but their contribution to distinct states of infection is unknown. Gene expression data suggest the activation of the NETosis pathway during human visceral leishmaniasis. Thus, we conducted an exploratory study to evaluate NET-related molecules in retrospective sera from VL patients, asymptomatic individuals and uninfected endemic controls. We demonstrate that VL patients and asymptomatic individuals exhibit differential regulation of molecules associated with neutrophil extracellular traps (NET). These differences were observed at the transcriptional level of genes encoding NET-associated proteins; in quantifications of cell free DNA and metalloproteinase 9; and in enzymatic activity of DNAse and elastase. Moreover, multivariate analysis resulted in class-specific signatures, and ROC curves demonstrate the ability of these molecules in discriminating asymptomatic infection from uninfected controls. Molecules that are associated with NETs are differentially regulated between distinct states of infection with L. infantum, suggesting that NETs might have distinct roles depending on the clinical status of infection. Although unlikely to be exclusive for VL, these signatures can be useful to better characterize asymptomatic infections in endemic regions of this disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 24%
Student > Master 7 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 15%
Researcher 3 9%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 3 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 26%
Immunology and Microbiology 7 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 9%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 6%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 4 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 June 2017.
All research outputs
#9,059,038
of 11,317,953 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#2,080
of 2,819 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#192,245
of 267,496 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#130
of 143 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,317,953 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 143 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.