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Comparative physical genome mapping of malaria vectors Anopheles sinensis and Anopheles gambiae

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, June 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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Title
Comparative physical genome mapping of malaria vectors Anopheles sinensis and Anopheles gambiae
Published in
Malaria Journal, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-1888-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yun Wei, Biao Cheng, Guoding Zhu, Danyu Shen, Jiangtao Liang, Cong Wang, Jing Wang, Jianxia Tang, Jun Cao, Igor V. Sharakhov, Ai Xia

Abstract

Anopheles sinensis is a dominant natural vector of Plasmodium vivax in China, Taiwan, Japan, and Korea. Recent genome sequencing of An. sinensis provides important insights into the genomic basis of vectorial capacity. However, the lack of a physical genome map with chromosome assignment and orientation of sequencing scaffolds hinders comparative analyses with other genomes to infer evolutionary changes relevant to the vector capacity. Here, a physical genome map for An. sinensis was constructed by assigning 52 scaffolds onto the chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). This chromosome-based genome assembly composes approximately 36% of the total An. sinensis genome. Comparisons of 3955 orthologous genes between An. sinensis and Anopheles gambiae identified 361 conserved synteny blocks and 267 inversions fixed between these two lineages. The rate of gene order reshuffling on the X chromosome is approximately 3.2 times higher than that on the autosomes. The physical map will facilitate detailed genomic analysis of An. sinensis and contribute to understanding of the patterns and mechanisms of large-scale genome rearrangements in anopheline mosquitoes.

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X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 46%
Researcher 2 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 4%
Student > Bachelor 1 4%
Student > Master 1 4%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 6 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 31%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 23%
Computer Science 3 12%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 27%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 February 2018.
All research outputs
#7,229,289
of 23,577,654 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,166
of 5,653 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,862
of 318,172 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#75
of 133 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,577,654 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,653 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 318,172 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 133 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.