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Glass eels (Anguilla anguilla) have a magnetic compass linked to the tidal cycle

Overview of attention for article published in Science Advances, June 2017
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

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Title
Glass eels (Anguilla anguilla) have a magnetic compass linked to the tidal cycle
Published in
Science Advances, June 2017
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.1602007
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alessandro Cresci, Claire B. Paris, Caroline M. F. Durif, Steven Shema, Reidun M. Bjelland, Anne Berit Skiftesvik, Howard I. Browman

Abstract

The European eel (Anguilla anguilla) has one of the longest migrations in the animal kingdom. It crosses the Atlantic Ocean twice during its life history, migrating between the spawning area in the Sargasso Sea and Europe, where it is widely distributed. The leptocephalus larvae drift with the Gulf Stream and other currents for more than a year and metamorphose into glass eels when they arrive on the continental shelf and move toward coastal areas. The mechanisms underlying glass eel orientation toward the coast and into freshwater systems are poorly known. However, anguillid eels, including the glass eel life stage, have a geomagnetic sense, suggesting the possibility that they use Earth's magnetic field to orient toward the coast. To test this hypothesis, we used a unique combination of laboratory tests and in situ behavioral observations conducted in a drifting circular arena. Most (98%) of the glass eels tested in the sea exhibited a preferred orientation that was related to the tidal cycle. Seventy-one percent of the same eels showed the same orientation during ebb tide when tested in the laboratory under a manipulated simulated magnetic field in the absence of any other cue. These results demonstrate that glass eels use a magnetic compass for orientation and suggest that this magnetic orientation system is linked to a circatidal rhythm.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 87 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 126 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 125 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 17%
Researcher 20 16%
Student > Master 18 14%
Student > Bachelor 12 10%
Professor 11 9%
Other 19 15%
Unknown 24 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 52 41%
Environmental Science 22 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 2%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 <1%
Other 10 8%
Unknown 33 26%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 166. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 June 2022.
All research outputs
#244,536
of 25,382,440 outputs
Outputs from Science Advances
#1,971
of 12,215 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,217
of 331,431 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Advances
#37
of 219 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,382,440 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,215 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 120.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 331,431 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 219 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.