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A novel method for estimating the number of species within a region

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, March 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
14 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
71 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
A novel method for estimating the number of species within a region
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, March 2014
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2013.3009
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elad Shtilerman, Colin J. Thompson, Lewi Stone, Michael Bode, Mark Burgman

Abstract

Ecologists are often required to estimate the number of species in a region or designated area. A number of diversity indices are available for this purpose and are based on sampling the area using quadrats or other means, and estimating the total number of species from these samples. In this paper, a novel theory and method for estimating the number of species is developed. The theory involves the use of the Laplace method for approximating asymptotic integrals. The method is shown to be successful by testing random simulated datasets. In addition, several real survey datasets are tested, including forests that contain a large number (tens to hundreds) of tree species, and an aquatic system with a large number of fish species. The method is shown to give accurate results, and in almost all cases found to be superior to existing tools for estimating diversity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 3 4%
Australia 3 4%
United States 3 4%
Canada 3 4%
Mexico 2 3%
United Kingdom 2 3%
Brazil 2 3%
Spain 2 3%
Switzerland 1 1%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 46 65%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 24 34%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 27%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 6%
Student > Master 4 6%
Other 15 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 48 68%
Environmental Science 14 20%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Unspecified 1 1%
Other 2 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 April 2018.
All research outputs
#2,119,336
of 13,353,516 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#3,954
of 7,467 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,632
of 244,544 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#105
of 165 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,353,516 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,467 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 29.0. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 244,544 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 165 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.